Homonyms Quiz #1

We give you a pair of definitions. You guess the homonym.
Homonyms are words that have the same spelling and pronunciation, but different meanings.
Includes both true and polysemous homonyms
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: June 9, 2016
First submittedNovember 1, 2011
Times taken59,892
Average score60.0%
Rating4.12
5:00
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Meaning #1
Meaning #2
Answer
Type of bird
Catholic official
Cardinal
Dark red color
To abandon on a
deserted island
Maroon
Place for strays
Unit of weight
Pound
Personnel
Wizard accessory
Staff
Piece of
superhero attire
Point of land that juts
into the sea
Cape
Spherical object
Formal dance
Ball
Legal arena
To romance
Court
Type of poker
Male breeding animal
Stud
Strike with the fist
Fruit juice beverage
Punch
Social gathering
Political group
Party
Meaning #1
Meaning #2
Answer
An addiction
Nun's clothing
Habit
To record
Adhesive material
Tape
Nifty
Without ice
Neat
Type of footwear
Trunk of a car in Britain
Boot
Type of fish
Diving position
Pike
Boat maneuvered
using a pole
American football kick
Punt
Half of a whale's tail
Improbable occurrence
Fluke
Piece of sports
equipment
Fraudulent scheme
Racket
Seaman's left
Type of fortified wine
Port
Elementary
Having a high pH
Basic
+1
Level 15
Nov 1, 2011
The highest is only 75%. Wow.
+1
Level 67
Dec 13, 2018
87% now for cape
+6
Level 55
Apr 28, 2014
My husband made fun of me for saying "tape" when I meant record. He has a point. When was the last time you recorded something on tape?
+18
Level 83
Jul 29, 2014
When was the last time your boss paid you in salt? But we still use the word salary...
+1
Level 63
Sep 3, 2015
Haha, fantastic point :)
+1
Level 34
Oct 16, 2020
True! ^-^
+4
Level 68
May 8, 2021
Am I the only one? No wonder my doctor says work is giving me hypertension, lol.
+1
Level 83
Jul 29, 2014
though, on the other hand, I do think "tape" as a verb is falling out of favor. Much more common to hear "record," "save," or even "TiVo" which is itself fairly obsolete. People still call their mobile phones cell phones even though we stopped using cellular technology a long time ago, but that term seems to be waning as well in favor of "mobile," "smart phone," or in some places "hand phone." Some terms like this stick and some don't.
+1
Level 65
Oct 13, 2016
I always say tape. Regardless of what I mean. And it's been 10 years since I used a VHS to record.
+3
Level 58
May 8, 2021
I just call it a "phone".
+1
Level 83
May 8, 2021
with the increasing rareness of landlines, yes, simply saying "phone" is becoming a more and more popular alternative.
+1
Level 58
Oct 21, 2021
Which is ironic, because I pretty much never call anybody on it...
+1
Level 80
Oct 13, 2016
In my language (and probably others as well) we can still "spin" music, movies etc, regardless of the media
+1
Level 81
May 12, 2017
Last week, actually.
+1
Level 67
Dec 13, 2018
When is the last time you recorded something on a record?
+4
Level 87
Sep 12, 2019
The verb came before the noun. That's a flip flopped comparison.
+4
Level 50
Jun 21, 2014
I prefer elementary. Imagine Sherlock Holmes saying 'Basic, my dear Watson.' Yeah. No.
+3
Level 49
Jul 29, 2014
Well, it's not like he ever said that 'quote' in the first place.
+8
Level 49
Jul 29, 2014
It's not like he actually existed.
+4
Level 50
Sep 6, 2014
Whatever, it still sounds cool. Actually, he came very close, when speaking to Watson, he did say 'Elementary,' and 'my dear Watson', in very close proximity to each other. Besides. 'Luke, I am your father' never actually happened. 'Beam me up, Scotty' never happened. It's just association.
+1
Level 74
Feb 15, 2021
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lag22Hl2RQw

Maybe not in the stories, but he certainly did on film. Watch the tape...

+1
Level 25
Aug 7, 2015
Can we change "unit of weight" to "unit of mass" please?
+11
Level 82
Nov 4, 2015
The clue is correct. Pounds are not a unit of mass; they are a unit of weight (or in a more general sense, force). Much of the confusion is because the typical unit used with the Imperial/US system is a force (pounds), whereas the typical metric/SI unit is a unit of mass (kilograms). Outside of science and engineering, few know the Imperial unit of mass (slugs) or the metric unit of force (Newtons). Adding to the confusion, quasi-official units have come into use, such as "kilogram-force" (kgf) and "pound mass" (lbm), which use earth's gravity as the "standard" acceleration relating force and mass.
+5
Level 55
Jul 6, 2016
So thanks to homonyms, the phrase "The ball is in your court" could mean that the formal dance is in your romance.
+3
Level 48
Oct 13, 2016
No because court is a verb m8... that's like saying "the ball is in your swim"
+1
Level 42
Oct 13, 2016
No, Court is definitly not a verb.
+5
Level 59
Feb 9, 2019
Matthew07 are you serious?
+1
Level 55
Feb 25, 2020
Matthew07 it is a verb in this sense
+1
Level 66
May 25, 2022
Nope. But it could mean that a judge is hosting a formal dance at the courthouse
+5
Level 64
Oct 13, 2016
I believe the piece of sports equipment is spelled "racquet."
+3
Level 66
Sep 17, 2018
In the UK it is. In the USA it's a racket.
+1
Level 61
Sep 8, 2021
That gives a whole new level to the crime of racketeering.
+1
Level 58
Oct 13, 2016
excellent challenge
+1
Level 78
Oct 13, 2016
occurrence. two r's.
+6
Level 52
Oct 18, 2016
i put "tea party" for the political group...
+1
Level 52
Sep 28, 2018
are you from Boston??
+1
Level 52
Feb 14, 2017
3.45
+1
Level 41
Feb 23, 2017
did anyone else put commune for social gathering and political group?
+1
Level 56
Aug 21, 2017
A pound is not a unit of weight, it is a unit of mass. A unit of weight is a Newton, for example.
+4
Level 43
Jan 18, 2018
The clue is correct. Pounds are not a unit of mass; they are a unit of weight (or in a more general sense, force). Much of the confusion is because the typical unit used with the Imperial/US system is a force (pounds), whereas the typical metric/SI unit is a unit of mass (kilograms). Outside of science and engineering, few know the Imperial unit of mass (slugs) or the metric unit of force (Newtons). Adding to the confusion, quasi-official units have come into use, such as "kilogram-force" (kgf) and "pound mass" (lbm), which use earth's gravity as the "standard" acceleration relating force and mass.

(Taken from FreeStateBear)

+1
Level 87
Sep 12, 2019
Amazing. Long-form answer and still the same short-form objection appeared.
+1
Level 72
Feb 25, 2020
A Newton is a unit of force, not weight
+2
Level 55
Feb 25, 2020
Weight is a force
+1
Level 28
Dec 21, 2020
Newton is a unit of weight because weight is the unit of force on an object due to gravity so you are both correct
+1
Level 72
May 23, 2018
This was a tricky one, I missed a few.

Sometimes you see the answers and you're mad you didn't think of it but in this case I just was too flummoxed by half of a whale's tale, I had never heard that described as a fluke. Now I know!

+2
Level 39
Jun 26, 2018
...i thought fluke was the whole tail end...
+2
Level 67
Dec 13, 2018
Isnt racket just a lot of noise? (And something to play tennis with) never heard of it as a fraudulent scheme. I tried stick.. there is a stick-up...
+1
Level 58
May 8, 2021
Well, I know about 'racketeering', so maybe there is some relation...
+1
Level 67
May 11, 2021
I don't think "fraudulent scheme" is a great description of "racket". Racketeering has to with conspiracy and organization, it doesn't really have anything to do with fraud. Colloquially, a racket likewise has do with conspiracy or organization. Price-fixing and monopolies are rackets, but they're not fraudulent. Private prisons are rackets, as are many services with oligopolies or monopolies that sell services required by law or the government, but they're not fraudulent.
+1
Level 69
Apr 1, 2019
I don't agree with all of these, so I'll just make my own clues.

Piece of sports equipment - Fraudulent scheme - Noise

Type of fish - Diving position - Weapon good against cavalry

Boat maneuvered using a pole - American football kick - Country the ancient Egyptians used to trade with

+1
Level 74
Nov 25, 2019
Without ice? Neat? Never heard of that usage.
+3
Level 68
Nov 25, 2019
It's mostly used in bars when ordering a drink. it's basically the opposite of "on the rocks" which means with ice. For example you might say "I'd like a bourbon, neat."
+1
Level 74
Feb 15, 2021
In the states.
+1
Level 34
Oct 16, 2020
I feel very stupid.
+1
Level 66
Apr 25, 2021
The only one I missed was the "neat" question. Sooo close to a perfect score.
+2
Level 78
May 8, 2021
A bishop is a type of bird, and also in the catholic church
+3
Level 59
May 8, 2021
Surely 'neat' means without water (or anything else, mixers and so on) rather than specifically without ice?
+2
Level 73
May 8, 2021
What's the connection between wizards and staffs? When I was a kid, wizards had wands (although not as personnel, obviously).
+2
Level 55
May 10, 2021
Gandalf
+1
Level 73
May 10, 2021
Sorry, what?
+1
Level 81
May 12, 2021
Were you a kid before Arthurian legends arose? There are plenty of old depictions of Merlin with a staff. Gandalf, probably the most famous wizard in modern fantasy fiction (and consequently the archetype for modern depictions) is depicted as using a staff in The Hobbit, which was released in 1937. Gandalf's prominence was significantly reinforced in 1954 by the release of The Lord of the Rings. Since then most fantasy depicts wizards as using staffs, with notable exceptions being Disney's Fantasia, released in 1940, and Harry Potter, first releasing in 1997. The origins of both wands and staves are much older though. Rods, sceptres, wands, batons and staves have long been symbols of power. The magical staff might be based in the image of Moses and his staff, or perhaps the staves of Celtic Druids, or some combination thereof. Magical wands have a specific occult basis since around the Middle Ages.
+1
Level 74
May 12, 2021
A fluke isn't an improbable occurrence. It's achieving by luck something that you probably can't replicate.
+2
Level 81
May 12, 2021
Ever heard of a fluke accident? Has nothing to do with achievement or replicability. What you described is one way the word is used, but it fits within the broader definition the quiz features. Besides, an improbable occurrence is, by its nature, unlikely to be replicated.
+1
Level 72
Apr 16, 2022
Nope...it just means an unlikely occurrence or something you think probably won't happen again. Doesn't have to be lucky.
+1
Level 48
Oct 21, 2021
In the correct, proper, queen's English; racket and racquet are not homonyms.
+1
Level 71
Oct 30, 2021
You're not suggesting that the Queen pronounces things Frenchly, are you?

There's a hard 't' at the end of both when said properly in English.