thumbnail

Fastest Growing U.S. Cities

Try to name the American cities which have gained the most residents since the year 2000.
By city proper population, 2000–2021
Cities that are not the largest in their metro area marked in blue
Quiz by Quizmaster
Rate:
Last updated: May 28, 2022
You have not attempted this quiz yet.
First submittedOctober 3, 2011
Times taken58,249
Average score50.0%
Rating4.26
4:00
Enter city here:
0
 / 24 guessed
The quiz is paused. You have remaining.
Scoring
You scored / = %
This beats or equals % of test takers also scored 100%
The average score is
Your high score is
Your fastest time is
Keep scrolling down for answers and more stats ...
Gain
City
459,235
New York
400,814
Fort Worth
338,881
Charlotte
334,619
Houston
307,615
Austin
307,207
San Antonio
303,524
Phoenix
218,997
Jacksonville
Gain
City
195,058
Columbus
193,031
Raleigh
181,593
Oklahoma City
177,005
Frisco
170,545
Seattle
168,356
Las Vegas
165,959
Irvine
163,439
Gilbert
Gain
City
160,558
Bakersfield
158,645
North Las Vegas
158,211
San Diego
156,827
Denver
154,477
Los Angeles
148,321
McKinney
146,797
Henderson
133,327
Nashville
72 Comments
+8
Level ∞
May 28, 2022
This list is going to look weirder in the coming decade. Most major cities are now losing population. New suburbs are growing rapidly. Frisco's population has increased more than 500% since 2000.
+12
Level 62
May 26, 2018
No Orlando? Wow....
+4
Level 78
May 26, 2018
I expected Orlando as well. I'm curious to see exactly where it ranked in
+4
Level 85
May 27, 2018
Looks like it's gained about 91,000.
+3
Level 62
Jun 4, 2018
Is there something special about Orlando?
+12
Level 70
Jul 5, 2018
It's quintessential urban sprawl
+10
Level 82
Jul 17, 2018
it's the happiest place on Earth.
+17
Level 48
Jul 17, 2018
More so than Finland!? 🇫🇮
+6
Level 62
Aug 9, 2018
I live near Orlando and it seems like in a decade it went from Wyoming to Manhattan
+3
Level ∞
May 28, 2022
Orlando is #26 with a gain of 123,203.
+4
Level 76
May 28, 2018
Hmm, hard to know which suburbs (eg Frisco, a part of Dallas-Fort Worth) count as answers here, and which get absorbed into larger cities' answers.
+3
Level 72
May 29, 2018
I tried Arlington, don't know if I've ever heard of Frisco. I remembered that Arlington is on the 50 and 100 biggest US cities quiz that I took somewhere.
+2
Level 56
Jul 5, 2018
The fact that Frisco is considered a suburb of Dallas now really shocked my Dad when he was helping me look for an apartment in the area. He grew up in a (no longer) small town a ways west of there but moved away 30 years ago. From his perspective the area suddenly went from spread out teeny towns to HOUSES EVERYWHERE!
+2
Level 73
Jul 17, 2020
Me too, but that's cause I live in Plano
+2
Level 44
Jul 17, 2020
Yeah, that is weird. Good thing I used to live there!
+4
Level 72
May 29, 2018
I'm surprised to see no Bay Area city on the list, weird.
+6
Level 85
May 31, 2018
San Jose
+2
Level 62
Jun 4, 2018
As FreeStateBear said, San Jose is here. However, a poll came out today suggesting that nearly 50% of San Francisco residents hope to move away within a few years. Though there are alot of opportunities there, the housing bubble is pushing people away.
+9
Level ∞
May 27, 2020
San Jose no longer appears on the list and actually lost residents from 2018-19. I suppose there's a limited supply of people who can afford $2 million houses.
+3
Level 73
May 27, 2020
They are all moving to Sacramento which I was surprised isn't on here. Although I suppose most of the growth isn't in Sacramento proper but in the suburbs.
+2
Level 41
Jul 17, 2020
People are leavin California because of high taxes, and natural disasters.
+7
Level 83
May 31, 2022
*man-made disasters.
+4
Level 62
Jun 2, 2018
It is interesting to me that Texas and California cities make up half of the top twenty. Also, North Carolina has two cities on the list.
+3
Level 75
Jul 17, 2018
Maybe jobs and retiring baby boomers looking to stay warm?
+7
Level 67
Jul 17, 2018
Raleigh and Charlotte were no brainers for me (since I live in NC). Both have grown like crazy and continue to do so. They aren't attracting retirees so much as well-educated high earners looking for jobs in high-tech (Raleigh) and banking/industry (Charlotte).
+2
Level 60
Jul 17, 2020
Yup, my Aunt went to Raleigh in 2015 and currently lives there
+2
Level 47
Jul 21, 2020
I'm currently living in NC. Raleigh has established itself as a tech center. Tech as of now is where the economy is leaning towards. In North Carolina its called the Researches Triangle (Raleigh, Durham and Greensborro) This is the largest tech center outside of Silicon Valley and NYC.

Austin though is rising, definitely competing with Raleigh but more importantly NC and Texas are competing with Silicon Valley. Though it seems Texas is getting more people nowadays given the dramatic growth of Austin.

+4
Level 71
Jun 7, 2018
Got New York City by typing New York........ did not get Oklahoma as I did not try 'City'......... big city bias.
+14
Level 47
Jun 24, 2018
The official name of New York CIty is City of New York. And when sending mail you just put New York, NY. I don't think you could send mail by putting Oklahoma, OK.
+7
Level 89
Jul 5, 2018
But you could type OKC.
+4
Level 74
May 28, 2020
Close. City of New York, like New York City, is simply a way of referring to it so as not to confuse it with the state. The official name of the city is simply New York.
+3
Level 45
Jul 5, 2018
Wheres boise?
+2
Level 56
Jul 5, 2018
According to Google it's grown by about 30k between 2000 and 2017. Which is a big change (about 6% growth) but not top-of-the-list.
+4
Level 84
Jun 10, 2020
It would be interesting to see a quiz of cities with the most growth percentage wise. There are probably a lot of smaller suburban cities that have added huge numbers recently.
+2
Level 56
Jul 5, 2018
Surprised to see my hometown on the list! This explains my feeling that there used to be a lot more opens spaces around...
+4
Level 68
Jul 17, 2018
No Detroit??
+5
Level 24
Apr 25, 2020
You a troll? Detroit is shrinking fast. It would probably top the list of fastest shrinking cities of America.
+2
Level 54
Oct 27, 2020
Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Chicago et al might give it a run for its money. All the old cities that boomed from the Great Migration and/or automobile industry are now shrinking.
+1
Level 67
Jun 6, 2022
Play

https://www.jetpunk.com/user-quizzes/42995/the-fastest-shrinking-us-cities

or

https://www.jetpunk.com/quizzes/fastest-shrinking-us-cities

if you want to know where Detroit stands

+3
Level 36
Jul 18, 2018
Very surprised that Portland isn't on this list.
+2
Level ∞
May 27, 2020
Portland has gained 125,000.
+1
Level ∞
May 28, 2022
Portland is now losing population. Its gain since 2000 is now 112,000.
+2
Level 75
May 27, 2020
Crazy that Frisco is on here boasting a population of just 188,000
+3
Level 75
May 27, 2020
And McKinney with 191,000! Dallas suburbs are booming
+2
Level 75
May 28, 2020
My friend has lived in Frisco since about 2005 - I think his parents invested in real estate at the right time
+2
Level 42
Jun 20, 2020
365,000 people move to texas every year
+2
Level 70
Jul 17, 2020
Raleigh should be in North Carolina, not California
+3
Level ∞
Jul 17, 2020
Fixed
+2
Level 56
Jun 8, 2022
Wow. You moved a whole city from the West Coast to the East Coast in less than a day! Now that's efficiency.
+2
Level 68
Jul 17, 2020
I only managed to guess the obvious ones I have heard of (11/20) - why does everyone want to live in Texas? Is it a good place to live?
+3
Level 29
Jul 19, 2020
There are a lot of hurricanes and tornadoes because it's in the middle of USA and it is right next to the Gulf Of Mexico
+3
Level 54
Oct 27, 2020
To be fair, Austin and San Antonio avoid both those problems. Although they don't escape the terrible heat that all of Texas shares.
+2
Level 59
Feb 17, 2021
much easier to do business in Texas, so where all the jobs are moving, and therefore people, especially since housing is cheap, because they have lots of construction jobs. Kind of a rolling ball.
+3
Level 54
Oct 27, 2020
Not really. People move here because of opportunity. Texas is where It's Happening in so many industries, and it has crazy affordable housing. So very pragmatic reasons, no one's moving here because they dream of living in Texas. The weather is abysmal, and there isn't much going for it culture and tourist-wise.
+1
Level 28
May 17, 2021
Most of the cities are booming, and lots of Fortune 500 companies are moving here.
+2
Level 67
Jul 17, 2020
I thought Chandler might be on here unless they consider that part of Phoenix. What about Nashville?
+2
Level 29
Jul 19, 2020
Ya mean MRBEAST'S Chandler
+1
Level 62
Jun 6, 2022
Chandler would've been standalone had they ranked. Gilbert made it on its own
+2
Level 46
Jul 18, 2020
When you're from Dallas-Ft. Worth and easily guess the two suburbs :)
+3
Level 29
Jul 19, 2020
Dallas, Fort Worth, Austin, San Antonio, Houston. Those cities...
+3
Level 74
Jul 20, 2020
Columbus? huh. Would have thought any number of sun belt cities would clock in higher.
+1
Level 71
May 4, 2021
Columbus is definitely pretty modern and has a lot of recent growth. It's also nicer than other cities in Ohio. I wouldn't be surprised intrastate migration accounted for a lot of it--people leaving Cincinnati, Cleveland, and Toledo to settle in Columbus.
+2
Level 16
May 4, 2021
I live in a small western Oklahoma town with a few hundred people and still got all of them
+1
Level 23
Sep 10, 2021
I live on the border of Frisco and mckinney
+3
Level 68
Jun 6, 2022
many texas cities.

it seems that republican policies attract democrats from other states, who then procceed to vote for democrats in texas which had destroyed their states in the first place.

+1
Level 59
Dec 12, 2022
i mean they also could just be looking for some cheap housing, idk why this argument is used, as the biggest cities on here are like LA and NYC, which are super large so they have a plethora problems, but are no means "destroyed"
+2
Level 71
Jun 6, 2022
No Atlanta? I thought for sure they would be here.
+1
Level 72
Jun 6, 2022
Atlanta's at +82,241 since 2000. Problem is that Atlanta city limits are a pretty small portion of the metro area, compared to similar sized metros. 498k out of a metro population of 6.09 million. Metro Atlanta is +1,977,617 since 2000.
+1
Level 82
Jun 6, 2022
If this was urban area rather than city proper then I'm pretty sure Washington DC would make the list, and Virginia Beach, and probably a couple more cities in Texas and Florida, as well. and maybe Ohio.

Doing it that way, I'm also pretty sure Jacksonville would not make the cut (it's municipal limits are relatively gigantic), and of course all of these blue-colored cities (Ft Worth, etc) would just be absorbed into their larger urban areas and not individually represented.

+1
Level 71
Jun 6, 2022
Yeah @ JeromesNiece, that's probably it. And @kalbahamut, you're probably right. It looks like Miami and Dallas, two other exclusions from the list I was pretty surprised by, follow the same pattern--little city proper growth but large metro growth.
+1
Level 42
Dec 12, 2022
Im surpised Orlando isnt on here
+1
Level 58
Feb 5, 2024
i imagine Port St. Lucie and Cape Coral are both close calls, i wonder if they would appear on the list if it was updated to the 2023 census estimates (which releases in a few months!)