G Vocabulary Words Quiz #1

Can you guess these vocabulary words that start with the letter G?
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: February 8, 2022
First submittedJuly 22, 2012
Times taken55,009
Average score63.6%
Rating4.22
5:00
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 / 22 guessed
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Definition
Word
Venetian boat
Gondola
Kitchen on a ship
Galley
To redraw voting districts in a
convoluted, unfair way
Gerrymander
Deadly sin of overeating
Gluttony
Avocado-based dip
Guacamole
Wildebeest
Gnu
1 followed by 100 zeroes
Googol
Person who is not Jewish
Gentile
Soviet prison camp
Gulag
Louisiana creole stew made
with okra
Gumbo
Rubbery boot, worn over shoes
to keep them dry
Galoshes
Definition
Word
Indian spiritual teacher
Guru
Command to make a horse go faster
Giddyup
To strangle to death with a wire or cord
Garrotte
Tip; service charge
Gratuity
Grotesque cathedral decoration which
directs water away from the walls
Gargoyle
Evil spirit that robs graves
Ghoul
Union of tradesmen in a Medieval city
Guild
Systematic killing of an entire
group of people
Genocide
Small watery cave, often found in gardens
Grotto
Cold tomato soup of Spain
Gazpacho
Hospital stretcher
Gurney
+1
Level 49
Jul 16, 2012
I missed "Giddyup" because I've always heard it pronounced and written it as "Giddyap". (Maybe this is regional? I'm from the Southwestern US.) The dictionary lists "Giddyup", "Giddyap", and "Giddap" as all being valid spellings and pronunciations; you should probably accept all of them.
+1
Level ∞
Jul 22, 2012
Those will work now.
+2
Level 67
Mar 27, 2018
Geeup should also by accepted. As someone who has spent many years training horses I was VERY surprised to see 'geeup' was not accepted as that is how it is normally referred to in training.
+2
Level 39
Jul 15, 2018
...we gee up in the uk...
+1
Level 40
Apr 21, 2020
In the Western/Southwestern US, we sometimes just say "gitup" or "geeup". But I believe it all came from "get up" --> giddyup.
+2
Level 70
Jun 11, 2022
Where I live, we say “Glue Factory!” and the horse runs like Seabiscuit
+1
Level 39
Jun 12, 2022
Wrong
+1
Level 55
Jun 13, 2022
In Germany, we say "hü"...
+1
Level 76
Jul 21, 2012
A ghoul is someone who robbed graves - generally to steal the corpse for use at medical school and training centers for use in dissection. It got very bad in Europe a couple of centuries ago, and that's where the word comes from - it has nothing to do with the "undead" and because a couple of modern fiction writers misuse the word does not somehow change the definition because some hack writer or hollywood b-movie scriptwriter says so.
+8
Level ∞
Jul 22, 2012
I used to think so too, but I was wrong. The word comes to us via Arabic folklore.
+2
Level 67
Sep 9, 2019
You have it the wrong way around , that is definitely not were it comes from... just because people misused the word to indicate some graverobbers, doesnt chance the definition of the word. Not even if you say so (decided to keep the last comparison friendly.. without any adjectives)
+1
Level 70
Jun 11, 2022
Both Arabic and Persian have words which refer to evil, ghostly entities which feed on corpses. French also gets the word ‘goule’ (ghost) from the same origin. The English usage as a term for a graverobber is an extension of this original meaning, with the extension eventually replacing the original as the most commonly understood definition. Quizmaster has this exactly right. It’s not misuse if a word is borrowed and becomes commonly used to mean something else, that’s simply evolution of language.
+1
Level 17
Dec 23, 2012
got em all! Loved the quiz!
+5
Level 75
Jul 25, 2014
Please also accept Gumboots.
+2
Level 67
Mar 26, 2018
I typed gumboot and got the Louisiana stew! YUSS!!
+3
Level 44
Apr 18, 2018
But unlike galoshes gumboots usually aren't worn over shoes, right?
+1
Level 80
Feb 10, 2022
Those in the images don't look like they would fit over a normal shoe.
+2
Level 75
Feb 10, 2022
I see I asked for "gumboots" be accepted, a whole eight years ago! "Gumboot" is the only name these rubber boots are known as in New Zealand and Australia. Can I ask again please?!
+1
Level 65
Feb 12, 2015
Clue is singular "rubbery boot" yet answer is plural "galoshes". I typed galosh about ten times!
+1
Level 68
Feb 12, 2015
"Gulag" actually refers to the agency that administered the camps, not the camps themselves, although it's come to have this meaning over time. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gulag
+2
Level 81
Feb 9, 2022
So you could say that that's its meaning now? Just because something had one meaning initially, doesn't mean every meaning since that is wrong
+3
Level 78
Feb 12, 2015
Ha...for very large clam I tried GIANT
+1
Level 46
Dec 31, 2015
Same!
+1
Level 71
Dec 10, 2017
And after "giant" didn't work, I then tried "great".
+1
Level 75
Feb 9, 2018
You missed a bit out - it should be 'giant Pacific clam'
+1
Level 67
Mar 26, 2018
Ginormus?
+5
Level 56
May 2, 2015
anyone else try gazillion?
+8
Level 71
May 6, 2015
Yes I did,............ I remember a story about a man who told his girlfriend that two Brazilian Skydivers had died in an accident, she said how terrible, then after a minute asked "How many is a Brazilian?"
+1
Level 87
Jul 21, 2019
No, but I was wondering if it would work.
+3
Level 45
Nov 8, 2015
I had a ton of trouble spelling 'Gazpacho'... can you accept guzpacho, guspacho, or similar variations?
+17
Level 59
Jan 5, 2016
There's no real point in asking for alternate spellings. After the quiz is done, you can see the correct spelling. Learn.
+1
Level 43
Jun 2, 2016
tried gazillion for 1 followed by 100 zeroes before eventually realising what it was
+1
Level 37
Oct 29, 2017
To BlueDragon: Thank you! - I mean that sincerely. Never knew that

Gargoyles actually had a function.

+2
Level 44
Dec 19, 2017
I learned gerrymandering from CGP Grey.
+1
Level 47
Mar 26, 2018
I was wondering why I couldn't get "galoshes." I never realized until now that there was only one "L."
+1
Level 39
Jul 15, 2018
...i though gerrymandering was rabbiting on in parliament to use up the time limit and stop other people from speaking...
+3
Level 71
Feb 10, 2022
That's filibustering.
+1
Level 76
Feb 25, 2019
Don't you mean 'convoluted' instead of 'convulated'?
+1
Level ∞
Feb 25, 2019
Fixed, thanks
+3
Level 74
Sep 14, 2019
A Hungarian stew might be better known than one from Louisiana.
+1
Level 72
Feb 18, 2021
Gumbo is at 68%. I think it's fine.
+2
Level 46
Jan 17, 2022
If someone said Hungarian, I think most people would think GULASH, right?
+2
Level 61
May 24, 2021
Giddy up: gee up in British English. Found in all reputable dictionaries!
+4
Level 59
Feb 8, 2022
Am I the only one who tried "graverobber"?
+2
Level 82
Feb 8, 2022
OMG. I tried garret, garrit, and even garrot, but it's no good without the "te"!
+3
Level 70
Feb 8, 2022
On a side note, the definition of genocide accepted by the United Nations does not require the killing of the group. Any means of destroying an ethnic, religious, or racial group can fit the definition of genocide, including things like force sterilization and taking children from their parents to rob them of their culture.
+1
Level 72
Feb 8, 2022
Nice job specifying that a gargoyle acts as a water spout, distinguishing it from a grotesque.
+2
Level 81
Feb 13, 2022
I am sure that someone typed in Gestapo for cold Spanish tomato soup. In fact, i would argue that Gestapo should be added to this quiz because apparently some people don't know the difference.
+3
Level 88
Feb 15, 2022
A bit of spelling leeway on that last "e" in the answer for the clue about strangulation would be appreciated.
+1
Level 37
May 30, 2022
The actual answer makes sense but I tried grim reaper at first for the grave robber question.
+3
Level 67
Jun 11, 2022
Tried "goy" for "person who is not Jewish" and it was accepted. All is right with the world.
+3
Level 64
Jun 11, 2022
could you accept "german" at Person who is not Jewish
+1
Level 59
Jun 13, 2022
good idea
+2
Level 59
Jun 13, 2022
I got garrote because I watch too many mob movies and used to play too much Mortal Kombat
+1
Level 44
Jun 14, 2022
To "garrote" is the more common spelling, but it wouldn't take my response until I spelled it "Garrotte", which is not a common spelling in the US. Both should be accepted.
+1
Level 66
Jun 17, 2022
FYI there's also a Cajun version of gumbo which does not necessarily include okra (and absolutely no tomatoes). I'm in a Louisiana-based foodies group, and their debates on what is or isn't gumbo are legendary, maybe on par with some debates here on jetpunk! #ETB
+1
Level 65
Jun 19, 2022
Only one I missed was "1 with 100 zeros". Could only think of gazillion. Didn't think it was a real thing but had to try.
+1
Level 33
Jun 27, 2022
i was so sure it was gogol with one o but apparantly not lol