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General Knowledge Quiz #30

Can you answer these random trivia questions?
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: January 23, 2023
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First submittedApril 19, 2012
Times taken144,234
Average score65.0%
Rating4.01
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Question
Answer
What animal are elephants supposedly afraid of?
Mice
What started on September 1, 1939?
World War II
Who referred to a ring as "my precious"?
Gollum
Who was the demon barber of Fleet Street?
Sweeney Todd
What town did Superman grow up in?
Smallville
Which sign of the Zodiac is also a disease?
Cancer
In what country would you find the town of Marathon?
Greece
What is the term for a word or phrase which is spelled the same
forwards or backwards?
a Palindrome
Who is the namesake of a Latin America country, a Canadian province,
a major river, and two U.S. state capitals?
Christopher Columbus
If I sail on the Neva river past the Hermitage Museum, what city am I in?
St. Petersburg
If you are dining "al fresco", where are you?
Outside
What modern-day country contains most of the ancient region of Mesopotamia?
Iraq
What is made at a tannery?
Leather
What type of school offers a class called "torts"?
Law School
Who led England as Lord Protector from 1653–1658?
Oliver Cromwell
What country is the region Lombardy a part of?
Italy
What is the name of a receptacle designed to be spat into by tobacco chewers?
Spittoon
What was Medusa's hair made of?
Snakes
What word in the English language sounds like "segway"?
Segue
Name a country that is located in the Maghreb.
Algeria | Libya | Mauritania |
Morocco | Tunisia
+3
Level 44
Mar 18, 2014
Not to challenge the answer as it's the established western version, but fighting in WW2 really started in the early 1930s with Japan's invasion of the continent. Sort of like how the Vietnam War started in 1858.
+4
Level 74
Jul 16, 2018
I don't really know about the Vietnam part, but I sorta agree with the WWII part. Japan was a major combatant in that war and that's when they actually began their part of the war even though it didn't start in Europe for a few more years. They were in a unbroken pattern of war in which Pearl Harbor (and yes I know that Europe was already a war by then) was just another step for them. As time went on more and more countries from all continents were pulled into it in Europe and the Pacific - fighting for different things, but all happening at the same time making it a world war. If that makes any sense...
+6
Level 77
Jul 22, 2018
Try telling an Austrian or a Czech that WW2 started in 1939! However the question is not 'when did WW2 start' but 'what started on 1 September 1939'. Thus WW2 is an acceptable answer as it is the date that most of the world recognises but 'invasion of Poland" should also be accepted which it isn't.
+2
Level 73
Jan 5, 2022
Considering that Austria and Czechoslovakia didn't go to war against Germany I would say that most Austrians and Czechs wouldn't have an issue with saying the war started in 1939.
+1
Level 71
Feb 3, 2023
I think an appropriate start date for the war would be July 7th, 1937, which is when Japan began its full-on invasion of China. That being said, I won't contest the fact that September 1st, 1939 is the widely accepted date for the start of World War 2.
+4
Level 87
Dec 28, 2018
1858's a serious stretch. In English "the Vietnam War" refers specifically to the U.S.-Vietnam war. Other struggles against France, Britain, China, the Khmer Rouge or Japan are labelled as such in English, in which coincidentally, we are communicating.
+4
Level 62
Mar 18, 2014
There is a town named Marathon in Ontario, Canada
+4
Level 18
Jul 11, 2018
There is one in the Florida keys, too.
+9
Level 74
Oct 23, 2018
Right, they're both named after the famous one in Greece, from which the word "marathon" comes.
+6
Level 73
Apr 7, 2021
Right, but the question isn't "In what country is the original town of Marathon?"
+10
Level 73
Jan 5, 2022
Uh huh. There's a tiny municipality called Alexandria where my grandparents had a farm. If a quiz asks "What type of building is Alexandria famous for", I want to write my grandparents' log house. I really do. But that'd be stupid and I'd write Pharos.
+1
Level 73
Jan 24, 2023
Library!
+1
Level 59
Feb 28, 2023
Pharos is lighthouse.
+1
Level 34
Apr 16, 2022
There is small town in west Texas by that name as well.
+3
Level 83
Mar 18, 2014
Oliver Cromwell, Lord Protector of England (Puritan) born in 1599, died in 1658 (September).
+14
Level 51
May 21, 2014
The dates in the clue were when Cromwell WAS Lord Protector of England, not his birth/death dates.
+19
Level 77
Jul 16, 2018
If not, dude was a REALLY famous 5 year old.
+4
Level 87
Dec 28, 2018
Thanks for the clarification. I thought he was the most influential person to die at 5 in world history.
+2
Level 78
Jan 24, 2023
It took nine years to find someone who recognizes the Monty Python quote?
+4
Level 52
Jul 30, 2015
ironically, the word palindrome is not a palindrome...
+9
Level 74
Mar 26, 2018
No, but it is an emordnilap!
+3
Level 87
Dec 28, 2018
Cool. Nice bacov drow.
+2
Level 87
Dec 28, 2018
Before someone says I didn't use it right, I know. So does Spellcheck, it corrected it to bacon drown. A great way to die.
+1
Level 72
Jan 23, 2023
Doesn't it have to actually be a word to be an emordnilap? Otherwise every word is an emordnilap, which doesn't make it special at all.
+11
Level 76
Jul 18, 2018
Ironically, the word ironic and it's derivative forms are usually used incorrectly
+3
Level 61
Oct 23, 2018
nerd
+3
Level 76
Mar 26, 2019
Sure, I'm fine with that :-)
+1
Level 71
Feb 11, 2023
You mean irony.
+4
Level 66
Oct 23, 2018
And "abbreviation" is a very long word.
+1
Level 56
Oct 23, 2018
Alliteration is usually not alliterative.
+2
Level 76
Nov 17, 2022
That’s because a single word can never be alliterative…
+3
Level 76
Apr 5, 2019
Disabled toilets are the only ones big enough to run around in
+1
Level 71
Aug 21, 2015
There is also a Marathon in upstate New York. However, I think it's pretty obvious what country is being referred to.
+28
Level 46
Nov 26, 2016
"What started on September 1, 1939?"

september

+3
Level 63
Apr 16, 2017
I tried the same thing.
+1
Level 55
Jan 23, 2023
September 1, 1939
+1
Level 71
Feb 3, 2023
Ba-ba-ba-BAH-DI-YAH
+1
Level 71
Dec 5, 2017
Like this quiz, try my General Knowledge 28 ......here it is
+2
Level 56
Dec 20, 2017
Interestingly, palindrome is not a palindrome
+7
Level 76
Oct 23, 2018
Uninterestingly, you repeat previous comments.
+4
Level 71
Jul 15, 2018
I think 'Segue' as a word in the English language is pushing the boat out a bit. A French musical term such as this will not be in the normal vocabulary, and will never be heard of again.
+7
Level 74
Jul 15, 2018
I hear that term a lot in regard to movies or TV.
+11
Level 90
Jul 16, 2018
I hear and use the term all the time in business. Often during meetings someone will ask if they can segue into a related topic. And the response that's invariably given is "Segue away."
+6
Level 81
Jul 16, 2018
I hear this one often as well. After thinking about it, I think I hear it most when someone is pointing out how awkward the transition from one topic to another was. As in, "Wow, that was a weird segue."
+9
Level 77
Jul 16, 2018
segue is used literally all of the time. You hear radio hosts talking and someone will segue into another topic and they say "nice segue." The problem is that most people think that the word they are saying is spelled "segway" and are surprised when shown the actual spelling.
+7
Level 74
Oct 23, 2018
Yeah, this is a relatively common word in English, meaning "to transition."
+3
Level 76
Oct 23, 2018
I assumed that's where the Segway got its name - one uses it to "segue" from one place to another.
+7
Level 69
Oct 23, 2018
The growing crescendo of comments here might indicate that this is an appropriate opportunity to segue into suggesting that you check your dictionary before making such pronouncements
+2
Level 79
Oct 23, 2018
And also, it's Italian, not French
+2
Level 71
Feb 11, 2023
I see what you did there. Segue--> musical term-->crescendo. Well done!
+1
Level 60
Oct 23, 2018
I think Rat should be accepted for Mice.
+2
Level 67
Oct 23, 2018
No, I think rats are too big.
+4
Level 62
Nov 20, 2020
Please accept baby rat. They're the size of mice.
+5
Level 76
Jan 26, 2023
Rodents of unusual size? I don't think they exist
+1
Level 78
Jan 3, 2020
The first question should either be asking for animals (plural) or the first answer should be singular (mouse)
+1
Level 51
Jan 28, 2020
Lmao didn’t know the mice one. Also bacarri rambo should be accepted
+2
Level 68
Mar 24, 2020
Shouldn't subway be accepted for the segway question? In my opinion, it sounds more like segway.
+6
Level 23
Sep 9, 2021
Segue is pronounced literally the same as segway. If you don't think they sound alike you're pronouncing them wrong
+3
Level 62
Jul 5, 2021
Bilbo also calls the Ring 'my precious' early on in FotR
+2
Level 60
Jul 19, 2021
I'm surprised that only 25% got St. Petersburg tbh. The Hermitage is quite a famous museum.
+1
Level 55
Jan 23, 2023
Never heard of it. Only got it due to the Neva part.
+1
Level 57
Jan 25, 2023
Not everyone cares for such things, i dont and only got it by googling the river.
+2
Level 69
Feb 9, 2023
i.e. cheating
+1
Level 39
Aug 18, 2021
I didn’t know there was a town named Marathon in Greece, but there is also a town in the US in the Florida keys with the same name.
+1
Level 61
Aug 27, 2021
That's why we have marathon races today, cuz of the legend of that guy who ran all the way there to deliver a letter
+1
Level 76
Nov 17, 2022
I don’t know about mice, but elephants are certainly scared of bees
+1
Level 19
Jan 23, 2023
It's very nice!
+1
Level 77
Jan 23, 2023
Whoa, 95% got the elephant question!
+1
Level 61
Jan 25, 2023
16/20, guessed randomly for law school
+1
Level 76
Jan 26, 2023
"It's not a palindrome! The palindrome of Bolton would be Notlob! It don't work!"
+1
Level 70
Mar 7, 2023
even though "al fresco" is Italian, no one in Italy would say they dine "al fresco" if they dine outside.

If you're "al fresco" (lit. "in the cool") you're in jail!