L Vocabulary Words Quiz #1

Can you guess these vocabulary words that start with the letter L?
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: August 4, 2017
First submittedOctober 12, 2012
Times taken55,755
Average score63.6%
Rating3.95
5:00
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Definition
Word
Primate found only in Madagascar
Lemur
Waiting time between connecting flights
Layover
Person who studies languages
Linguist
Maze
Labyrinth
Jousting weapon
Lance
String instrument played by King David
Lyre
Offspring of a male lion and female tiger
Liger
Pertaining to the Moon
Lunar
Rental agreement
Lease
Deadly
Lethal
Defamation in print
Libel
Singular of lice
Louse
Definition
Word
Pantry
Larder
Man who loads and unload ships
Longshoreman
Style of golf course built on
coastal dunes
Links
Person who is not a member
of the clergy
Layperson
One of the two main types of beer
Lager
Male equivalent of lass
Lad
Plunder
Loot
Person who wins laurels; Nobelist
Laureate
Hawaiian veranda
Lanai
Skin-tight, one-piece garment
worn by dancers
Leotard
+2
Level 43
Nov 3, 2012
Lemurs are also found on the comoros islands
+9
Level 81
Jun 4, 2018
They are also found in North Carolina, Switzerland and Jersey. But they are only native to Madagascar.
+7
Level 79
Mar 29, 2014
What is God's name is a Larder? Never heard of that.
+7
Level 52
Sep 13, 2016
More of a British word, bit outdated though - a food storage room basically - only like the size of a closet/cupboard
+4
Level 83
May 21, 2017
First time I've ever heard that word. Cursed word kept me from getting 100%, but at least I learned something. Just a shame that I have the memory of a goldfish. :-P
+1
Level 67
Aug 19, 2019
I find them both weird, I guess lard is kept in a larder and pants in a pantry :D

(In a lot of houses here we call it a cellar (kelder), but it nothing like a basement or something, just a small space under the stairs, which does go a bit below floor level (like knee deep), a tiny stair/ladder with 2 steps. But hardly anyone steps down, cause stuff is mostly up on the shelves)

+11
Level 56
Aug 20, 2014
Given that Hawaii is approximately 12,000km from me, it's amazing that I actually know two 'L' words pertaining to Hawaii - Luau and Lei. Unfortunately the quiz asks for a third.
+3
Level 77
Jun 4, 2018
I'm American and I'd never heard the word until we went to Kaua'i and spent every morning eating breakfast on the one outside our condo. One can build a similar porch, deck, terrace, or veranda on the mainland, but it just doesn't seem the same as a lanai in Hawaii.
+4
Level 67
Aug 18, 2022
Crossword constructors owe a great deal to the vowel heavy Hawaiian language --- lei, luau, lanai, poi, nene, ahi, koa, aloha
+1
Level 60
Aug 28, 2022
You see this in USA crosswords because they like to use lots and lots of really small words and smash them all together. So you have almost 4x4 clusters of letters.

Whereas a European crossword (possibly global) uses longer words much more often.

+3
Level 70
Aug 18, 2022
Y'all need to catch up on Golden Girls.
+1
Level 65
Aug 19, 2022
I got lanai from watching Golden Girl , although that was in Florida.
+1
Level 77
Aug 20, 2014
Some made me think, but still got 'em all with 3:25 left. (Finally! This is the fifth quiz I've taken today, and the first in which I scored over 50%.)
+4
Level 15
Nov 25, 2014
Anyone else try "lie" for the singular form of lice?

XD

+3
Level 52
Mar 23, 2015
Never heard of longshoreman. I know them as stevedores
+2
Level 74
Mar 1, 2021
Longshoreman isn't used at all in the UK either. I wonder if any other English speaking countries outside North America use this word. I got it right, because I studied 'A View from the Bridge' at A-Level, but in the UK, they are dockers.
+2
Level 52
Oct 9, 2015
Never heard of "Longshoreman". In Australia they're "wharfies" or stevedores.
+1
Level 87
Sep 12, 2017
Can locker be an acceptable answer for a pantry? Not exactly the same but a lot more common and less archaic than the answer. I've heard the term food locker a lot more than I have the other one.
+2
Level 59
Jun 10, 2018
Interesting, I have heard larder a lot but have never heard of food locker. Where are you from?
+1
Level 67
Aug 19, 2019
afraid somebody will steal your food or that your food will sneak away at night?
+1
Level 66
Aug 19, 2022
Are you sure you're not thinking of Foot Locker?
+4
Level 67
Mar 22, 2018
Laity for layperson?
+2
Level 63
Nov 7, 2018
That was my first thought too, but I already know that the argument is going to be the clue. It says "person" and laity is a group.
+7
Level 84
Apr 4, 2018
Huh. I always thought "links" was just general slang for a golf course.
+1
Level 62
Apr 27, 2018
So did I. I know in Scotland the first golf started in the middle of my city and not near the sea, shores of an old loch though. It sort of makes sense since lots of Scotland is near the coast with sand and St Andrews is definitely by the sea. Links, apparently is a type of land, upon which golf became most played.
+4
Level 77
Jun 4, 2018
Sometimes the word links is used as a general term, but there is a real difference between links golf and parkland golf. Parkland courses are the ones that are carefully manicured with artificial bunkers and water features, and the only changes from one day to the next come from placement of the cups on the greens. Players can develop a strategy for each hole. Links courses are usually near the ocean with undulating dunes, wind, and natural vegetation but few trees, and the course isn't so immaculately groomed as a parkland course. Because weather can change the shape of the course, it isn't as easy to develop a regular strategy for play from one week to the next.
+1
Level 84
Jun 4, 2018
Guess if I had ever lived close to the ocean, I'd have a better chance of knowing the difference.

It would probably also help if I knew much of anything about golf :)

+1
Level 23
Jun 4, 2018
suprised that only 93% got lemur!
+2
Level 21
Jun 4, 2018
Who the heck says layover? In Oz it's a stopover
+3
Level 74
Jun 5, 2018
Probably Americans. In UK we use the same word as you do.
+2
Level 74
Mar 1, 2021
Agreed. Never heard it or used it in my life.
+3
Level 82
Aug 18, 2022
Never thought of this before, but yes, layover is an American term. Very rarely hear the word stopover here.
+1
Level 58
Jun 5, 2018
managed to answer them all but shouldn't "person who wins laurels; " be novelist ?? Quizmaster
+1
Level 63
Nov 7, 2018
The Nobel prize isn't just for literature, and not all Literature winners are novelists. All Nobel Prize winners are referred to as Laureates.
+7
Level 38
Jan 18, 2019
Anyone else try "loader" for person who loads and unloads ships? Haha
+1
Level 66
Apr 25, 2019
Laity should work for person who is not a member of the clergy
+1
Level 46
Jan 17, 2022
If it wasn't for Golden Girls, I would not know what a lanai was.
+1
Level 29
Jul 23, 2022
I thought LAIC or LAI should be good for someone who isn't a member of the clergy.
+1
Level 61
Aug 22, 2022
I know it's just the material, but plenty of people say that they are wearing their "lycra" when they refer to one-piece skin-tight workout (or as you have put - dancing) gear, so it would be great if this was accepted.