Neologisms #2

Can you guess these words that have entered the lexicon in the last 20 years or so?
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: January 2, 2020
First submittedSeptember 1, 2013
Times taken40,273
Average score65.0%
Rating3.73
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Definition
Word
A post on Twitter
Tweet
Smiley face or other ideogram such as 😀 or ❤️
Emoji
To spoil a photograph by unexpectedly appearing in it
Photobomb
To send someone a text of a sexual nature
Sext
Leggings that resemble jeans
Jeggings
To dance in a provocative manner, with thrusting hips in a low stance
Twerk
Hypothetical future robot of incredibly small size
Nanobot
The practice of dressing up like a character from a movie, video game, or anime
Cosplay
Three-letter expression of disinterest, popularized by the Simpsons
Meh
To look something up using a search engine
Google
To participate in live-action role-playing
LARP
Word used to denote the action of eating, similar to zzz for sleeping
Nom
To put one's hand to one's face in an expression of dismay
Facepalm
"Landscaping" of a man's body hair
Manscaping
An overly sensitive person who might "melt"
Snowflake
Three-letter word similar to "bro", but more inclusive
Fam
The wife or girlfriend of a prominent athlete
Wag
To suddenly cut off all contact with someone, particularly as a means
of exiting a relationship
Ghost
To use an electronic cigarette
Vape
Muscular to the point of looking swollen
Swole
+8
Level 76
Oct 14, 2013
oh...put one's hand to one's OWN face...i was trying to think of the term for "talk to the hand"
+2
Level 64
Jan 25, 2014
That was my 1st thought too, but even before I began to write I figured it out.
+1
Level 73
Mar 3, 2017
Same here.
+1
Level 66
Jun 9, 2020
I prefer the less popular "dopeslap" for this one.
+4
Level 35
Jan 29, 2014
I wouldn't say twerking is provocative xD
+5
Level 88
Mar 21, 2014
Are you under 25? Cuz that's why you don't think twerking is provocative.
+11
Level 75
Aug 1, 2014
It certainly provokes a reaction in me when that Cyrus creature does it. Not a good reaction, but definitely a reaction...
+1
Level 63
Mar 4, 2017
Lmao
+8
Level 60
Mar 10, 2019
Sorry grandad
+20
Level ∞
Jan 1, 2020
Lol at the all the people who think that twerking is just a normal everyday occurrence for people under 25.
+3
Level 45
May 7, 2019
You haven't seen it in a rap video
+2
Level 77
Mar 4, 2015
Never heard of half of these. I have enough trouble remembering the words I already know without adding to the list, but I'll do my best to catch up.
+3
Level 68
Apr 26, 2016
I'm with you, I have never heard the term wag before
+3
Level 73
Mar 5, 2017
Wives And Girlfriends
+3
Level 67
Dec 16, 2018
I did but had no idea what it stood for, thanx @ruudsje
+2
Level 77
Jun 9, 2020
I always thought wag meant wild a** guess.
+4
Level 81
Dec 1, 2015
So THAT'S where the word "meh" came from. I picked it up off my sister a while back. She's never watched the Simpsons either, so I have no idea where she got it from.
+15
Level 68
Apr 26, 2016
I never thought of it as coming from the Simpsons. They certainly used it but I had no idea they "popularized" it
+4
Level 55
Mar 16, 2017
A LOT of words and phrases have come from The Simpsons. The show's been running since 1989 and it's still going, making it the longest-running TV show in history. It's therefore not surprising that many folks (myself included) use phrases from The Simpsons without knowing that's where they came from, since they've become part of the general lexicon (same with Star Trek and Star Wars).
+7
Level 51
May 4, 2017
MasterKenobi:

"The show's been running since 1989 and it's still going, making it the longest-running TV show in history. "

Sorry Man, but Coronation Street has been on since 1960 and Guiding Light went from 1952-2009. Hell, As the World Turns was on for 54 years.

Sure they are soap operas, but they are still television shows.

+2
Level 72
Dec 17, 2017
It is the longest running American sitcom, the longest running American animated show, and the longest running American scripted primetime show. But yeah, there are a bunch of other shows -- daytime soap operas, talk shows, and news shows especially -- that have been on longer. I believe Meet the Press is the current champion, having run continuously since 1947.
+1
Level 72
May 7, 2019
I mean... good for Coronation Street, As The World Turns, and Guiding Light, but I somehow doubt any of them introduced any words or phrases that have gone on to enter the common lexicon! :-)
+1
Level 77
Jan 11, 2020
How about "soap opera" and "soaps"?
+3
Level 68
Jun 9, 2020
My favourite examples of simpsonisms that are now in the dictionary are "embiggen" and "cromulent" which both come from the same episode.
+1
Level 67
Jun 9, 2020
I don't think it made the dictionary, but "malparkage," referring to parking one's car terribly or illegally, is my favorite Simpsonism, among many great ones.
+1
Level 59
Jun 13, 2020
@ cyclonus that wasn't the point though- the point was the utter disrespect to call the simpsons the longest running programme in history! Corrie is a national treasure and deserves better than to be snubbed like that

(please know I'm only teasing, but I am also deadly serious xD)

+1
Level 47
Apr 22, 2016
???????
+1
Level 58
Aug 22, 2016
Loving the description to explain language that seems so familiar to us.
+11
Level 88
Oct 9, 2016
Never heard of Google. I bing things up.
+9
Level 74
Jan 3, 2020
Yahoo for you!
+4
Level 69
Jun 9, 2020
I Ask Jeeves. He's not very responsive of late.
+2
Level 83
Jun 9, 2020
I ask my mother-in-law. She knows everything. (rolls eyes)
+1
Level 73
Sep 23, 2022
I just post the wrong answer in the comments on this site
+2
Level 79
Nov 17, 2016
Any chance on accepting nanite?
+1
Level 9
Nov 27, 2016
kind of hard
+4
Level 82
Jan 21, 2017
Got everything but wag, which I had never heard of. I looked it up, I get that it's an acronym for "wives and girlfriends", read about the origin on Wikipedia... and I still don't understand why it only applies to the wives and girlfriends of athletes. Why are all other wags not wags?
+1
Level 47
Mar 3, 2017
love this quiz
+1
Level 47
Mar 3, 2017
i had to search up what a neologism was though...0
+2
Level 77
Jun 9, 2020
I'd never heard the word until I saw it on this site so I wondered if neologism was also a neologism, but according to Merriam-Webster the first known use of the word was in 1772.
+1
Level 63
Mar 3, 2017
I've only used "nom" when the food was actually delicious.
+2
Level 55
Mar 3, 2017
This was fun and so easy. I got 17/20 and my 11 year old got them all but whipits which I'm ok with lol
+2
Level 59
Mar 3, 2017
Proud to say I only got 9
+2
Level 77
Mar 4, 2017
I find it interesting that cavemen communicated by drawing pictures on their cave walls. Eons later we are again communicating with pictures, only we call them emojis. :)
+9
Level 83
Apr 27, 2017
This quiz sadly reminds me how stupid the world is getting. Mindless slang is taking over, terrible diction/grammar gets validated instead of corrected, since anyone who DARES offer any sort of correction whatsoever is immediately branded a grammar-Nazi or some such thing.....*sigh*

People could care less about what word they should of used, irregardless of whether or not it jives with what proper verbage would dictate. Their just so careless with there grammar, that when you hone in on the problem, its just heart-wrenching and leaves a pit in your stomach too see hear, they're and everywhere.

Okay, that was cathartic.

+7
Level 54
Jul 21, 2017
People don't type perfectly on the internet to save time. Get over it.
+1
Level 53
Jan 30, 2018
Yes, but I, along with many others, would also prefer understanding what people are saying.
+2
Level 53
Jan 30, 2018
Now that you mention it, don't they teach you how to type in school? If it is all about saving time, shouldn't one be proficient it typing, considering how much technology rules our world today? If I were some teenager whose world is controlled by a smartphone, surely I would take time to actually learn how to use the keys.
+6
Level 72
Dec 6, 2018
How would learning typing help on a smartphone? You're not exactly gonna be using the home keys and all ten fingers.
+3
Level 81
Jan 2, 2020
All that about spelling and grammar and then you use "irregardless" ? That rather invalidates your point.
+9
Level 80
Jan 2, 2020
Probably intentional, just look carefully at the whole penultimate paragraph.
+8
Level 67
Jan 15, 2020
That is the only one you spotted?? He tried to make as many errors in that paragraph as he could. There are atleast 8 of them. (Perhaps more, but english isnt my mother tongue, so maybe missed other stuff.)
+4
Level 77
Jun 9, 2020
I counted twelve, and I probably missed some, too. (Thirteen if you count the slang use of jive.) I almost missed verbage for verbiage. Well done, Don.
+6
Level 67
Jan 15, 2020
People have sure missed the joke on this one..
+1
Level 63
Jun 9, 2020
ok snowflake
+4
Level 72
Jun 9, 2020
Does no one on Jetpunk understand sarcasm...
+3
Level 69
Jun 9, 2020
Nice! Particularly 'heart-wrenching' included in the penultimate paragraph. I had to forget you were being sarcastic at that point and screamed "It's heart-rending" at the screen!
+1
Level 83
Jun 9, 2020
To borrow a quip from Keith Olbermann: 14 errors, for those of you scoring at home. (or even if you're alone)
+1
Level 49
Jul 25, 2017
I wrote num instead of nom...seriously, this isn't a proper word so some flexibility should be allowed in the spelling
+2
Level 81
Oct 28, 2017
Look it up, it is now in the dictionary so it counts as a proper word.
+2
Level 67
Jan 15, 2020
I have never ever seen it written as num. Perhaps you had only heard it before and never seen it and made up yourself/assumed it was spelled num?
+2
Level 77
Jun 9, 2020
I hear num num all the time, but Cookie Monster says nom nom, and he's the expert. (I don't know what was wrong with plain old yum, but that's just me.)
+1
Level 72
Jun 10, 2020
"Nom" represents the sound/act of eating itself. "Yum" is what you say after you eat something you liked.
+1
Level 81
Jan 4, 2018
Curious how the word creation tradition at the moment is very much in the realm of portmanteaux. My own habit is to create words out of Latin roots, French words, and things that sound like they should be English words but probably aren't.
+1
Level 84
Nov 8, 2018
I guessed flexivore.
+2
Level 84
Jun 9, 2020
for a word that's no longer on the quiz
+2
Level 23
Jul 21, 2019
Huh, I guessed 'trophy wife' for wag.
+4
Level 75
Jan 3, 2020
Spelling: sensitive
+6
Level 76
Jan 4, 2020
Just a while ago read U of Michigan release on which age group of people are the most sensitive (and selfish/self centered, narcissistic, controlling and other negative traits). Turns out it's the people born between 1929 and early 60s. The study was US population only and based on psychological profiles collected by said university.

Personal observation in Europe says it's roughly the same around here. So called "boomers" (years vary depending on country) generation would seem the most sensitive of all. Coincidentally, the timing seems to be related to WW 1 & 2 fallout, e.g. childhood abandonment and war crazy ("shell shocked" = PTSD) parent(s).

Just an interesting detail...

+1
Level 70
Jan 9, 2020
Never heard of "Fam" or "Swole" before. Are they US words, any other Brits heard them used over here? Could well be

I am just auld and out of touch with the yooof of today.

+1
Level 77
Jan 11, 2020
I'm American and I've never heard of them either, but I don't watch a lot of TV and when I do watch it's usually British shows.
+2
Level 67
Jan 15, 2020
Not us or uk. I have heard of fam, but I wouldnt have considered it a word. Plus I hate, I dont know why but it turns my guts and makes the hair on the back of my neck stand on end. (Dont think I have that with any other word though bae is rathrr creepy too..)

So I was rather well, shocked and appaled? haha to see it being used in dr who last week !! Not in a convo between 15 year olds hanging in the streets, but by the dr herself !! So no idea how prevalent it is in real life in the UK but you certainly could have heard about it.

Edit: there is even a wikia entry about it. https://tardis.fandom.com/wiki/Fam (had to check if I wasnt seeing/hearing things haha)

+1
Level 67
Jan 15, 2020
Auld and yooof haha that made me smile :)
+4
Level 69
Jun 9, 2020
I'd say 'fam' is very much a UK thing. I love it personally although being middle-aged I don't use it in public, as I would look like a right melt.
+1
Level 58
Jun 9, 2020
The clue for snowflake reads "sensitve" instead of "sensitive."
+1
Level ∞
Jun 9, 2020
Fixed
+1
Level 67
Jun 9, 2020
I didn't get 'Fam' I kept trying 'Pal' and 'Guy'
+5
Level 69
Jun 9, 2020
Love 'fam'. Been around for years in the UK. Also 'famalam' was around for a bit.
+3
Level 84
Jun 9, 2020
Never heard of the athlete wife. The clue for "fam" was confusing for me but I get it now that I see the answer.
+1
Level 60
Jun 10, 2020
Same.
+2
Level 66
Jun 9, 2020
Just fyi, the Simpsons took meh from old school NY talk. It's Yiddish and if you grew up in or around the city in the 50s thru 70s, you knew it well.
+3
Level 67
Jun 9, 2020
I actually think most of these are good additions...not the acts they represent, but the words themselves are fun. Vivid, playful, some good portmanteaus in there. Not crazy about "swole," "wag" is both stupid and a word we absolutely do not need, and I think "snowflake" is just about the dumbest, laziest appellation I've ever heard, but the other words are really good additions.
+1
Level 66
Jun 9, 2020
Alternate spellings of "swole"? For example, "swol" (not very aesthetically pleasing either way).
+2
Level 63
Jun 9, 2020
Possibly include manscape (the infinitive/unconjugated form) for manscaping? I almost didn't get it at first.
+1
Level 34
Jun 9, 2020
Twerking is so stupid and overrated
+1
Level 53
Jun 10, 2020
I don't think that "To dance in a provocative manner, with thrusting hips in a low stance" is a good clue for "twerk", even if it's in the dictionary. The dictionary being euphemistic, because they don't want to say "women shaking their buttocks as hard/fast as possible". There are a lot of other dance moves that do actually involve thrusting hips, like grinding, hip rolls, the sway, etc.
+1
Level 43
Jun 11, 2020
lol I don't know why I couldn't think of photobomb. I kept typing in Rick Roll
+1
Level 49
Oct 6, 2021
Never heard of jeggings, twerking is not dancing, just a handy way for us to recognise people with a distinct lack of class.