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Pack Animals

Can you name the types of animals that are traditionally used as "beasts of burden".
A pack animal, aka beast of burden, is an animal is used to carry things for humans
This quiz uses common names, not scientific ones
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: December 5, 2019
First submittedDecember 16, 2014
Times taken7,856
Average score63.6%
Rating4.05
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Animal
Camel
Dog
Donkey
Elephant
Animal
Horse
Llama
Mule
Ox
Animal
Reindeer
Water Buffalo
Yak
+5
Level 68
Dec 17, 2014
Title makes it very confusing. Was thinking of things that are pack hunters. Don't really know what a "beast of burden" really is.
+1
Level 55
Dec 18, 2014
Same
+2
Level ∞
Dec 18, 2014
I put a note in for those who don't know what the quiz is asking for.
+4
Level 76
Dec 18, 2014
I like your choice of picture
+1
Level 88
Dec 21, 2014
Didn't even notice that, very funny.
+1
Level 80
Jan 30, 2016
Took me a little while to see the connection... :)
+7
Level 63
Jan 2, 2015
No carrier pigeon?
+2
Level 58
Jan 30, 2015
That's what I was thinking!
+1
Level 70
Aug 21, 2019
I though of them too!
+1
Level 72
Jan 13, 2015
Thank you, Quizmaster, for the added note. I also didn't know what you meant until I read it (not a native speaker). But what about buffalo and water buffalo? Why is not only buffalo accepted?
+1
Level 73
Jan 29, 2015
I also tried buffalo (thinking old world buffalo) and didn't think to try water buffalo. Glad they were in alphabetical order because otherwise I would not have thought of yak.
+1
Level 84
Jan 29, 2015
I also tried buffalo, thinking of water buffalo not bison. That should be accepted. And what about cows? I see them used to carry stuff a lot in various countries I've been to. Is there not a "tradition" of this?
+1
Level 84
Jan 29, 2015
Online I've found conflicting information on how much difference there is between cows and oxen.
+2
Level 77
Jan 29, 2015
We raise cattle, and in our area of the mid-south US an adult male is a bull, an adult female is a cow, a young female cow who has not given birth is a heifer, a young animal under one year of age is a calf, a young castrated male is a steer, and a castrated male four years of age or more is an ox. A veal is a calf fed mainly on milk (from either the mother or commercial formula) which gives the meat a lighter color, although some grain-fed young calves under 500 lbs. are butchered and called red veal. No idea if all this is officially correct or applies to other countries, but it's the accepted terminology in this agricultural region of the upper and mid-south US. (BTW, oxtails for sale in the store generally come from steers.)
+1
Level 48
Jan 31, 2015
That's not the way I know it. A castrated male is called a steer, period. An ox is any bovine animal that has been trained to pull or carry a load. (That, technically, can include buffalos and other bovines, as well as traditional cattle.) So: ox is a job title, not a gender, and can be bulls, cows, or steers. That said, most oxen are steers, because they are stronger than cows but more docile than bulls. (This comes straight from my ox-training friends in the rural Southwest.)
+1
Level 48
Jan 31, 2015
My friend also reminds me that the only reason a castrated male would be alive past one year is if he were to be trained as an ox, hence the confusion of the word. Typically, any animal you see described as an ox will be a castrated male past age one, but that is not actually because that is the definition of an ox.
+1
Level 84
Jan 31, 2015
^ yes, this is similar to some of the conflicting information I found. Also, apparently in some other languages there are similar terms that can apply across gender. Then I found some people saying there is genetic differentiation, too. Mysteries abound.
+1
Level 80
Jun 29, 2018
In my language the ox equivalent means just a castrated male, in context usually as pack animal but also as food.
+1
Level 49
Jan 29, 2015
What about humans? We usa each other as beast of burden on a pretty enormous scale
+3
Level 90
Jan 29, 2015
Can you please accept caribou?
+1
Level 22
Jan 29, 2015
I thought reindeers were only used to carry Santa Claus ;)
+1
Level 61
Jan 29, 2015
Shouldn't the Alpaca be on this list? Just wondering.
+2
Level 82
Feb 25, 2021
Alpacas are typically smaller than llamas and not as suitable to carry stuff. They´re usually kept for their wool.
+2
Level 50
Jan 29, 2015
You should accepted ass for donkey.
+1
Level 49
Jan 31, 2015
got dog right when I ran out of time lol
+1
Level 49
Jan 31, 2015
I should say i thought of it so I didnt get it actually :(
+2
Level 71
Aug 5, 2015
In Australia Goats were used to pull little carts ...... Billy Carts.
+2
Level 78
Mar 28, 2019
They are also used that way in the US. When I was a kid (pun intended) it was very common and I still have an old goat (pun intended) cart in my barn.
+3
Level 83
Nov 7, 2016
"A pack animal, aka beast of burden, is an animal is used to carry things for humans." - Would this definition not technically include pigeons? They carry things for humans. Sure, mainly just scraps of paper, but still.
+1
Level 90
Jan 23, 2019
they also use ferrets to take wires down small tunnels, but I'm guessing the definition means to cover travelling with the humans rather than postal service/other use.
+1
Level 67
Jul 7, 2020
I put in 'gnu' for wildebeest and it was not accepted.
+2
Level 78
Jan 17, 2022
But to be fair, nor is wildebeest
+1
Level 19
Sep 12, 2021
It seems rigged
+1
Level 78
Jan 17, 2022
I'm not the first to say it, but I think pigeons seriously deserve a mention - tens of thousands of them were used in World War 2 alone, and they've been used for carrying messages for thousands of years.
+1
Level 59
Oct 28, 2022
Can you accept 'Buffalo'?