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Demonyms Quiz

A demonym is a term that refers to a person from a specific place. For example, a person from Mexico is a Mexican. Can you guess these other demonyms?
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: August 28, 2018
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First submittedJune 27, 2011
Times taken154,572
Average score57.6%
Rating4.07
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a person from
is called ...
the United States
an American
the Netherlands
Dutch
Venice
a Venetian
Texas
a Texan
Philippines
a Filipino
Canada
a Canadian
Canada (slang)
a Canuck
Flanders
Flemish
Peru
a Peruvian
Indiana
a Hoosier
Paris
a Parisian
a person from
is called ...
Rome
a Roman
Moscow
a Muscovite
Troy
a Trojan
Iraq
an Iraqi
Spain
a Spaniard
Switzerland
Swiss
Berlin
a Berliner
Denmark
a Dane
Genoa
Genoese
Brittany
a Breton
Poland
a Pole
a person from
is called ...
London
a Londoner
New Zealand (slang)
a Kiwi
Liverpool
a Liverpudlian
Liverpool (slang)
a Scouser
Birmingham (slang)
a Brummie
Wales
Welsh
Los Angeles
an Angeleno
Cyprus
a Cypriot
Phoenix
a Phoenician
Naples
a Neapolitan
Michigan's UP
a Yooper
105 Recent Comments
+1
Level 78
Feb 28, 2016
Can you add 'Belgian' for Flanders?
+7
Level 69
May 30, 2016
Aren't there non-Flemish Belgians? (Sorry; I'm American and do not know these things automagically.)
+1
Level 82
May 21, 2017
There are.
+5
Level 82
Feb 18, 2019
Also, was "automagically" a typo?
+9
Level 75
Dec 11, 2020
Whether it was or not, I like the word and I am adding it to my vocab.
+4
Level 60
Nov 4, 2016
That would defeat the point of asking about the people who live in the specific region, now wouldn't it?
+1
Level 71
Dec 14, 2023
"A Flemish (man/woman)"?? This is just wrong to my ear, I would always have said "Fleming". This should certainly be allowed in any case.
+7
Level 65
May 16, 2016
For Los Angeles, it didn't accept: an "incredibly stuck-up, narcissistic, materialistic, soulless bitch." I'm from San Francisco. I feel strongly.
+3
Level 74
Nov 4, 2016
Los Angeles is not located in Marin County. Try again.
+6
Level 69
Nov 6, 2016
I tried that one for the Paris question. No luck either.
+1
Level 69
May 30, 2016
If you ever want to add more wacky ones (like Haligonian), don't forget that people from Cambridge are Cantabrigians!
+5
Level 59
May 5, 2019
That sounds like they come from Canterbury. How confusing.
+7
Level 68
Sep 6, 2016
Just Scouse should be accepted... never heard anyone called a "scouser" but I have heard people from Liverpool describe themselves as a just plain "scouse"
+2
Level 90
Nov 4, 2016
Absolutely +1.
+3
Level 60
Nov 4, 2016
Completely wrong. They are Scouse but the adjective is "Scouser."
+3
Level 60
Nov 4, 2016
Scouser is the noun used for people, scouse might get used as an adjective or as the accent - or as some weird kind of food (and I'm from Liverpool).
+2
Level 33
Nov 4, 2016
I've never heard someone from Poland being called a Pole. I've only heard them being called a Polock/Polack.
+8
Level 64
Nov 4, 2016
Then apparently your education derives entirely from jokes.
+1
Level 67
Nov 4, 2016
I've always seen it as Bromley for those from Birmingham.
+6
Level 60
Nov 4, 2016
Bromley is an entirely different place.
+2
Level 63
Nov 4, 2016
Darn, stopped at Scouse and forgot the R
+1
Level 85
Dec 11, 2020
That's the last time I take demonym advice from the Monkees.
+1
Level 32
Nov 4, 2016
You should accept canook or canoock as spelling
+3
Level 48
Nov 4, 2016
I vote against. Please accept the correct spelling.
+4
Level 82
May 21, 2017
What are you on aboot?
+2
Level 49
Nov 4, 2016
Interesting. Can the answer for liverpool-slang please be accepted without an r on the end? Although I know this quiz is quite old.
+1
Level 60
Nov 4, 2016
No - because that's the accent, not the people. Liverpudlians are scousers.
+1
Level 70
Oct 5, 2017
I tend to disagree. The first time I heard this usage I was in Ireland on holiday when an Irishman said "So your a scouse", I had not heard the expression before, I was 6 years old, and I took umbrage at being called something that I didn't know what it was. I was from Blackpool a whole 30 miles away from Liverpool. In my many years since I have heard 'Scouse' used this way more times than I've had hot dinners........ and I've had a few.
+1
Level 59
Nov 4, 2016
Go Skyrim for helping me with the Breton answer!
+1
Level 41
Nov 5, 2016
more people knew Liverpudlian than Scouser? surprising to me
+1
Level 66
Nov 5, 2016
I did a quiz with all the nationalities of the world, you can check it at my profile.
+3
Level 71
Jul 20, 2017
Canadians don't say canuck; I don't, no one I know does. It's something Americans like to think is cute, but it's just annoying.
+1
Level 70
Oct 5, 2017
I have heard the use of 'Canuck' as a derogatory term here in Australia. In fact in the Northern Territory I witnessed a fight between a Canadian guy and a Queenslander over the snarled usage of the term.
+6
Level 53
Oct 5, 2017
Who won?
+2
Level 70
Dec 11, 2020
It used to be a derogatory term directed towards French Canadians (particularly in America, where there was immigration from Quebec). I am not sure when it came to refer to English Canadians too, but today I really don't see how it is any different from other nicknames (Kiwis, Brits, Yankees, Aussies, etc.) The people who make a fuss about that sort of thing are usually overreacting just a tad.
+1
Level 63
Dec 11, 2020
Yeah i agree. It's not really that derogatory anymore. And I'm personally kinda fond of it because its the hockey team i grew up watching lol
+1
Level 78
Aug 1, 2023
This is an incorrect history of the term “Canuck”. It originated on the coast of British Columbia because many Hawaiian Kanakas worked in the shipping industry. Kanakas corrupted into Canucks, and many people assumed that the Hawaiian Kanakas people were indigenous British Columbians because they were very common on ships hailing from Canada. A significant population of Kanakas grew in Vancouver, too. Anyway, this is why the hockey team is called the very non-derogatory Vancouver Canucks.
+6
Level 68
Oct 5, 2017
Does that mean you're not familiar with that hockey team from Vancouver, BC?
+2
Level 77
Aug 19, 2017
I thought Filipinos were called Pinoy. Or is that slang?
+1
Level 82
Jun 3, 2018
Slang with positive connotations. If they see a beautiful Filipino woman they might refer to her as "Pinay."
+1
Level 33
Aug 19, 2017
Got quite a lot but disappointed that it took me so long to get trojan.
+3
Level 70
Jan 19, 2018
Someone who is Flemish is a Fleming.

Phoenicians came from Phoenicia (unless you are referring to the town in Arizona?)

+2
Level 43
Apr 13, 2018
The Arizonian(?) city is being referred to, yes.
+5
Level 70
Sep 8, 2018
Have you seriously called Phoenix (1.5 m) a TOWN?
+1
Level 48
Jan 30, 2018
well can't believe I remembered Hoosier and Genoese
+2
Level 64
Feb 16, 2018
You should add "Aussie" for Australians
+5
Level 47
Jan 29, 2019
Stupid Flanders
+2
Level 75
Feb 18, 2019
I, for one, tried Flanderseses.
+1
Level 49
Feb 18, 2019
Most of the ones I missed were the American ones, so it was interesting to learn what people from those places were called. Phoenicians for Phoenix. I would never have guessed.
+1
Level 69
Feb 18, 2019
I'd be happy never to be called a Brit by anyone ever again so glad that wasn't a question.
+1
Level 75
Feb 8, 2021
I have a feeling there's a harrowing best-selling novel leading up to this comment...
+2
Level 26
Feb 18, 2019
Excellent quiz! More, please ! I think this type of quiz would be a great addition to any geography badge, btw.
+1
Level 20
Feb 18, 2019
I missed Canadian *facepalm*
+1
Level 75
Feb 18, 2019
It would make me happy if people from Flanders were called philanderers
+1
Level 53
Aug 1, 2023
Thats the demonym for Paris actually
+1
Level 68
Feb 18, 2019
Should make an "Escanaba in da Moonlight" quiz
+1
Level 65
Feb 18, 2019
Maybe accept slight misspellings of "Venetian" in which an "i" is used for the 4th letter instead of an "e"?

I was super confused why my (misspelled) answer wasn't being accepted and couldn't figure out where the misspelling was (particularly since the letter "i" is pronounced with an "eeee" sound in Italian).

+1
Level 67
Feb 18, 2019
28/33. I stunned by how poorly most folks seemed to go with this quiz
+2
Level 75
Feb 19, 2019
Knew Liverpudlian but in all the spelling variations I tried I always stuck in an extra d. Still doesn't look right with only one. I was probably thinking of Lilliputian and mixing the two.
+1
Level 81
Feb 20, 2019
When you update, you should add Porteño for Buenos Aires.
+4
Level 78
Feb 22, 2019
Somehow it is illogical to call only people from USA American, since USA is just a part of Americas, geographically. In principle for example people from Canada, Mexico, Chile or Brazil are also American.

And then, I was once told by a Filipina that if I (a Finn) went to Philippines, they would most certainly call me there "Americano".

+1
Level 82
Feb 24, 2019
It's not illogical at all it is common, broadly understood convention. Do you feel it is illogical to call people from the United States of Mexico "Mexican?" How about referring to people from the US state of Georgia as "Georgian?" This is just stupid. Besides, things from North America are North American, things from South America are South American, things from either can be unambiguously described as "from the Americas," but American for centuries has been commonly understood to mean from the USA. It's about conveying meaning in a way that you will be understood and there's nothing wrong or illogical about it.
+4
Level 59
May 5, 2019
Not all that many centuries. Not yet reached 3.
+1
Level 75
May 15, 2019
I've no problem with calling things from the US "American" but it is also acceptable to use American meaning "from the Americas"

Maybe you weren't denying that, maybe you were just suggesting "from the Americas" for clarity

+3
Level 82
Nov 13, 2019
Yes, for the sake of clarity, since "American" is SO much more commonly used to refer to things from the country so commonly called "America" for short, it would be vastly superior to refer to things from North and South America as "from the Americas." To do otherwise you would almost have to wish to be deliberately confusing or antagonistic, and I don't see what the point of that is.

QuizWol, cut & paste from Wikipedia for your convenience: English use of the term American for people of European descent dates to the 17th century, with the earliest recorded appearance being in Thomas Gage's The English-American: A New Survey of the West Indies in 1648. In English, American came to be applied especially to people in British America and thus its use as a demonym for the United States derives by extension.

2019 - 1648 = 371 years, or nearly 4 centuries.

+1
Level 69
Dec 11, 2020
I typed in Murcan; didn't accept it.
+5
Level 59
May 5, 2019
I have started to refer to USAmericans as USAmericans, in writing anyway.

Technically Canadians are also American but are too nice and/or fed up to care any more about making that clear. They gave up. Hasn't done them any harm really.

+7
Level 82
Nov 13, 2019
I sure hope you are also referring to Germans as FRGermans, to Mexicans as USMexicans, to most Koreans as ROKoreans, and to the Chinese as PRChinese. Otherwise you'd probably look like a bit of a hypocritical muggins.
+1
Level 43
May 26, 2019
I only got yooper because my 5th grade teacher was one and taught us that demonym. 5th grade me was amused.
+1
Level 49
Jul 23, 2019
Only missed 4 so proud of that. I never knew Angeleno, not heard of it at all. And knew the word hoosier, just not what it was!
+2
Level 50
Dec 23, 2019
Lived in LA for 10 years and never knew Angeleno lmao.
+4
Level 70
Apr 30, 2020
Got all of them except for the American and British local ones and the slang words. I guess it's what I deserve for having committed the crime of not being an American.
+3
Level 44
Jun 17, 2020
Yooper is really oddly specific, feel like that one was thrown in specifically to bring down the average score lol
+2
Level 59
Dec 11, 2020
I know that one and Ive never been to Michigan
+1
Level 75
Dec 11, 2020
I have cousins who live there and refer to themselves in that way, but since I had only heard them and never seen it in writing I assumed since it referred to the Upper Peninsula it was spelled "UPer".
+6
Level 66
Jun 19, 2020
Phoenician for Phoenix seems really funny to me, since the city has nothing to do with ancient phoenicia. You learn something new every day.
+2
Level 63
Dec 11, 2020
This needs a No. 2, there's loads of interesting curveball ones out there like Monegasque or Sammarinese
+1
Level 32
Dec 11, 2020
As a Brit I didn't know what UP meant for Michigan.
+1
Level 68
Dec 11, 2020
Upper Peninsula
+3
Level 62
Dec 11, 2020
Had to look up Michigan's UP, never heard of that before. I have a hard time believing anyone outside of USA would have.
+1
Level 67
Dec 11, 2020
I went with Genovite. My bad. Still, 30/33 ain't bad.
+1
Level 78
Dec 11, 2020
Can you accept "yoopie" for "yooper", as that's how I've always heard it living pretty close to the area
+1
Level 74
Dec 11, 2020
I made a quiz on a similar topic a few months ago: Demonyms of British Cities.
+3
Level 47
Dec 11, 2020
Spelled Moscuvite in every possible way except the right one.
+2
Level 86
Dec 11, 2020
People from LA are called actors
+2
Level 76
Dec 11, 2020
can ‘scouse’ be accepted without the R? that’s the adjective
+2
Level 43
Dec 11, 2020
I tried Iraqian because I had no idea and it took Iraqi. :)
+1
Level 58
Jan 19, 2021
I am from the Phoenix area and the locals here seem pretty even split between people who call themselves Phonecians and those who hate that. I am the latter
+1
Level 88
Aug 7, 2023
What demonym do you prefer instead?
+2
Level 57
Apr 22, 2021
Phoenician is already taken..
+2
Level 77
Aug 11, 2022
that's what the indians said. Look where that got us
+3
Level 74
Nov 4, 2021
I know Hoosier is the official demonym as per the US Government Printing Office, but I still kinda feel like it should get a slang marker. Maybe not, I don't know.
+1
Level 78
Jan 5, 2022
Brummie here. A big thank you to Joe Pera for helping me get 100% on this quiz
+2
Level 36
May 7, 2022
Surprised how little people got ‘Brummie’, I thought it was quite commonly known
+1
Level 67
Aug 1, 2023
Me too, not so much in America I reckon
+2
Level 77
Aug 11, 2022
yoopers rise up!!!!!!!!!!!!
+5
Level 54
Jan 25, 2023
Moscovite

Moskovite

Moscowite

Moscavite

Moscuvite

Moscovian

Moscauvite

+1
Level 49
Aug 1, 2023
Ditto, homie. I thought i tried every variation of the spelling. Eventually I gave up.
+2
Level 48
Jul 27, 2023
Why doeesn't the quiz take napolitano -a?
+1
Level 73
Aug 2, 2023
Because that isn't English..?

Same reason it doesn't take Veneziano or Peruano or Polski or Schweizerisch (Suisse? Svizzero? Helvetii?). All of those are correct demonyms for this quiz, but being on the English part of the site, they're kind of looking for answers in English unless otherwise specified.

Although actually, I guess Napolitano is like Galician/Spanish for Neapolitan so it's more like why it doesn't take Venezianisch or Perufo kasa or Huitene or Liverpoolczycy.

+1
Level 67
Aug 1, 2023
Tried Brittish for Brittany for fun
+1
Level 49
Aug 1, 2023
My fav is people from of Charlotte, NC: Charlottean, not Charlatans.

They take great offense when that one is messed up!

+1
Level 68
Aug 2, 2023
Man. Moscovite, Briton, Youper. Spellings were killing me.
+1
Level 65
Aug 4, 2023
I know it's not commonly used (if ever), but please consider accepting "Unitedstatian".
+1
Level 34
Mar 24, 2024
You're making it too hard on us poor Americans(U.S)! Just add -ian after the place!