Religion Vocabulary

Can you guess these words related to religion based on a definition?
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: March 9, 2016
First submittedSeptember 12, 2013
Times taken19,726
Average score59.1%
Rating4.05
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Definition
Word
Catholic official who votes to elect the pope and often wears red
Cardinal
The Father, Son and Holy Ghost, collectively
Trinity
Indian religious belief that "what goes around comes around"
Karma
A sacred image used in Eastern Orthodox Christianity
Icon
Pilgrimage to Mecca
Hajj
Islamic concept that means "struggle", and sometimes "holy war"
Jihad
Place of purification before acceptance to heaven`
Purgatory
Hanukkah candelabrum
Menorah
Papal decree
Bull
Idea that the soul will move to another body after death
Reincarnation
Person who is not a member of the clergy
Layperson
Priest caste in Hindu society
Brahmin
Spiritual leader or head of a monestary in Tibetan Buddhism
Lama
Doubt-provoking Zen statement or question such as
"what is the sound of one hand clapping"
Kōan
Place for unbaptized babies, neither heaven nor hell
Limbo
The promised savior of the Jews
Messiah
The mercy of God that we have done nothing to earn
Grace
Ninth month of the Islamic calender, a month of fasting
Ramadan
When righteous Christians will ascend to heaven, prior to the tribulation
Rapture
State of liberation from desire (enlightenment) in Buddhism
Nirvana
Belief that there is only one god
Monotheism
To officially declare someone to be a Catholic saint
Canonize
+3
Level 76
Oct 15, 2013
Is Rapture and Apocolypse different? Does the Rapture occur DURING the Apocolypse? Along with a whole bunch of bad crap for the non-believers?
+2
Level 45
Oct 17, 2013
I'm not a Christian but I've read that some Christians believe the Rapture will happen before the Tribulations and some think it will happen as part of the overall 'End of the World' and the establishment of 'God's Kingdom on Earth'. Maybe a Christian will pop in and set me straight. I'll admit that Tribulation, Apocalypse, Rapture, Armageddon, Second Coming, Anti-Christ, Raising of the Dead, etc. etc. are all mixed up in my heathen brain.
+2
Level 36
Oct 28, 2013
They're all mixed up in everyone's brain. The concept of "the rapture" was taken from part of a verse in an apocryphal book that isn't even in the modern Christian bible. It was only believed by a very small sect of extremely fundamentalist Christians until the "Left Behind" series of books and movies came out and introduced it to popular culture.

tl;dr the rapture isn't in the bible.

+1
Level 36
Oct 28, 2013
But yes, it's part of the "End of the World" stuff.
+1
Level 72
Oct 28, 2013
thejoshgray, I don't know what your agenda is, but you couldn't be more wrong. The rapture is spoken of throughout the New Testament, though the term "rapture" isn't specifically used. I realize a quiz site isn't the place for a theology discussion, but your statement is ignorant of what the Bible actually teaches.
+1
Level 32
Oct 28, 2013
The Tribulation is a seven-year period where the world is united under a man whom we know as the "Antichrist". This man, who is led by Satan, establishes peace and order as the world completely decays morally. God, during this period, and especially in the second half, pours out His wrath on the world, culminating with the Battle of Armageddon, where the Antichrist leads a giant army to crush the State of Israel (and utterly fails in his attempt due to a timely intervention by Christ and His soldiers). The Rapture is the Christian's way to escape this coming wrath; the apostle Paul states that "we are not appointed to wrath", and also that the Rapture comes without warning, another way we can tell it is before the Tribulation. Jesus, however, expects Christians to know the time in which He returns, and the signs about which He warned are present across the world today.
+2
Level 82
Oct 29, 2013
thejoshgray, I don't know what your agenda is but I'm going to tell you what it is anyway. ;-)

No, rgc1600, the Rapture isn't spoken of throughout the NT. It's possibly alluded to once in 1 Thessalonians and I don't think it's an accurate reading of what's on there but I know that many disagree with me and that's fine.

And, there are different views of when it occurs in relationship to all the bad stuff. Some believe that believers will be raptured before the crap, some say in the middle of the crap and some say after the crap.

+1
Level 65
Oct 30, 2013
@thejoshgray: Actually the rapture is mentioned in the book 1 Thessalonians 4:17. While the term "rapture" isn't specifically mentioned (and it wouldn't have been used in the original translation anyway) the description of the rapture is detailed there.

And by the way it is not just "alluded to" as one person here said, it is actually described in detail. Maybe you need more to be convinced, but it is enough to convince me.

+1
Level 82
Oct 30, 2013
@ctleng76: I'm the one who's guilty of saying that 1 Thessalonians alluded to the rapture. The reason I said that is because the rapture is the belief that those believers on earth will escape the earth to dwell in heaven by means of the rapture. But this statement in 1 Thessalonians says nothing about going to heaven. All it says is that they'll meet the Lord in the air. Until the past couple centuries it was rare for anyone to assume that after this initial meeting that the next stage was going to heaven. What if the believers are meeting him in the air and then returning to earth? Or meeting in the air and flying around for a while? Or meeting in the air and then creating a new settlement on one of the bigger clouds up there?

The doctrine of the rapture is alluded to here, it's not explicit. And I happen to think that it's not teaching the rapture at all but the point of this thread isn't to argue for its truth.

Now I get to be a know-it-all I guess. Sorry about that.

+1
Level 50
Jun 19, 2014
Um... cintnuh, it's not the righteous, it's those who believe in Jesus Christ as the Son of God and Savior. Like me. The Tribulation is only 7 years long, and the final battle is more commonly known as Armageddon. I don't even know where the word apocalypse came from.
+2
Level 75
May 4, 2016
Armageddon is a place, the site of the final battle. Apocalypse is from the Greek and means 'revelation'. I'm not religious, so I don't know what interpretation religious persons have placed on these things.
+2
Level 63
May 28, 2018
Thank you, Wombat, for clarifying. It annoys me how often the word "apocalypse" is misused.
+2
Level 63
May 28, 2018
Also, I groan when people go on and on about how the signs from Revelation are upon us. Most of the signs they point out have been occurring to varying degrees since the scriptures were written. Doesn't the Bible teach that no person will know the day or the hour?
+1
Level 75
Jul 10, 2019
Well it sounds like a ridiculous plot, I hope the CGI makes up for it. Is it going to be showing in cinemas or is it straight to DVD?
+1
Level 67
Oct 8, 2019
7 years huh, *marks the calendar* ok, so that's leaves us about... hmm... so soon?
+5
Level 77
Jun 13, 2020
Just having "a Christian" pop in to straighten things out won't help since we all have different beliefs. I'm a Methodist and we focus more on following Christ's teachings for the world of today. The church is inclusive, and some believe in the Rapture, some don't, some think it already happened, and some don't care one way or the other because they figure if they live life as they should now they won't have to worry about it. I've never heard a sermon devoted to it but individuals will discuss it, especially after seeing movies such as Left Behind. My husband was an American Baptist when young, and he said they once had a preacher who was called in to settle a dispute among three members who were arguing whether the Rapture would occur before, during, or after tribulation, and the pastor told them, "I can make a case for any of the three ways." I prefer to tell people how following Christ has changed my life for the better, and sharing why I believe and remain strong in my faith.
+1
Level 83
Oct 28, 2013
This is one of the most debated areas of Protestant theology, especially among the flavors of Protestantism referred to as "dispensational" (e.g. Pentecostals, some Baptists). Basically, some believe that Christians will be "raptured" first, while nonbelievers will face assorted tribulations. Then, after other events whose order and significance are debated, the world will end. As I understand it, the Roman Catholic, Orthodox, Anglican, and Lutheran churches have never believed in this sort of progression/ timeline. They assert that the return of Jesus signals both the ascension of Christians into heaven, the Last Judgment, and all the other apocalyptic phenomena all at once.
+2
Level 53
Apr 30, 2015
Contrary to popular belief, the apocalypse is not the tribulation. "Apocalypse" simply means "unveiling", so in my opinion, it is the same thing as the second coming of Christ. I also tried "advent." I don't usually use the term "rapture" since it is usually used in association with the belief that the believers will be taken to heaven before the tribulation, and I don't believe that. I believe that the rapture/second advent (the first advent being when Jesus was born as a baby) will come after the tribulation and all of the believers will be taken to heaven at once. I'm not sure I've explained this very well.... Well, I tried. lol
+2
Level 53
Apr 30, 2015
In case you are wondering, I am a Seventh-day Adventist.
+5
Level 73
Jul 20, 2016
Nothing brings people together like a good discussion on religion.
+1
Level 33
Dec 28, 2017
Strictly the apocalypse has happened. It's the vision granted to John that makes up the Book of Revelations (apocalypse - αποκάλυψις -means revelation in Greek).
+4
Level 82
Oct 28, 2013
laity should be accepted.
+3
Level 28
Jul 22, 2016
I tried "laity" and simply "lay." When neither worked, I gave up...
+2
Level 67
Oct 29, 2013
Wouldn't mind if Transmigration was also accepted. I got it, but it seems to be at least as right an answer.
+1
Level ∞
Mar 9, 2016
That will work now
+1
Level 65
Nov 20, 2014
I agree that transmigration should be added. Many religious encyclopedias use the term, and Merriam-Webster lists one definition of transmigration as "to pass at death from one body or being into another": http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/transmigrate
+1
Level 81
Jan 6, 2015
So...the other thread got out of hand on "rapture"....but to get back to the point, are there other terms that could be accepted here, since a rapture is not a part of Christian doctrine that is widely accepted (for one, Catholics don't believe in it)? Perhaps "second coming" would be an answer that more people could get behind.
+2
Level 73
Mar 17, 2015
Got them all except for Bull. A papal decree is Bull?? Never heard of it! Judging by the percentages most people didn't either.
+3
Level 77
Jun 13, 2020
It's called a papal bull. The term came from the bulla (seal) that was attached at the end. I learned about them eons ago while doing a term paper on Martin Luther - he famously burned the one that excommunicated him.
+2
Level 66
Sep 13, 2015
It's even on Wikipedia:

The Hanukkah menorah or chanukiah (Hebrew: מנורת חנוכה‎ menorat ḥanukkah, pl. menorot) (also Hebrew: חַנֻכִּיָּה‎ ḥanukkiyah, or chanukkiyah, pl. ḥanukkiyot/chanukkiyot, or Yiddish: חנוכּה לאמפּ khanike lomp, lit.: Hanukkah lamp) is a nine-branched candelabrum lit during the eight-day holiday of Hanukkah, as opposed to the seven-branched menorah used in the ancient Temple or as a symbol.

+2
Level 45
Jul 13, 2016
I put dalai lama instead of just lama. What is the difference? Also, for a papal decree, I kept putting in encyclical and it wasn't accepted. Finally I thought of bull. Can you accept encyclical too?
+2
Level 85
Jul 13, 2016
Lama is a honorific title. Dalai lama is the head of a particular school of Tibetan Buddhism
+2
Level 72
Jul 19, 2016
I kept putting dalai lama as well but that is why I like these quizzes -- I learn something new.
+1
Level 83
Mar 3, 2017
Yep, I missed with "Dalai Lama" as well.
+3
Level 84
Jul 13, 2016
What about beatify for canonize? That's what I tried. I looked it up and says it's a synonym.
+9
Level 65
Jul 13, 2016
Beatification is a step prior in the process to canonization. A beatified person is titled "Blessed," and is not yet a saint.
+2
Level 85
Jul 13, 2016
If I recall correctly (I had fairly little (no) interest in religion classes at school) that's the step before canonization. Beatification requires only one attested miracle, while canonization requires two.
+1
Level 64
Jul 13, 2016
Koan: a paradoxical anecdote or riddle, used in Zen Buddhism to demonstrate the inadequacy of logical reasoning and to provoke enlightenment.

Perhaps accept paradox for the Koan question?

+1
Level 71
Jun 13, 2020
Nah, because not all paradoxes are koans. Koans are very specific dharmic teachings, given by a teacher to their student as a contemplative practice to help further the student on their spiritual path. So koans aren’t just any ol’ riddle or problem;for instance, Fermi’s Paradox, while certainly… paradoxical… is not therefore automatically a koan.

Aside to Dan: Using the adjective “doubt-provoking” on its own here gives the wrong impression I think. It’s not supposed to instill a general sense of doubt in oneself or the teachings, it is only supposed to free the student from thinking that logic and reason is the be-all and end-all of understanding and wisdom, when it is only the beginning.

+3
Level 70
Jul 13, 2016
The word menorah just means lamp in Hebrew. If it is specifically a Hanukkah candelabrum, it's called a hanukkiyah, which has about ten different acceptable transliterations.
+1
Level 56
Jul 13, 2016
Divine grace should work.
+3
Level 60
Jul 13, 2016
I will join with the others who commented that menorah is not the correct answer to the Hanukkah clue. Though I will admit that it is the term colloquially used in American culture. Still, it is incorrect. You could change the clue to read something like, "A seven-pronged candelabra that is a symbol of Judaism. Also colloquially (but incorrectly) used as a term for the 9-pronged Hanukkah candelabra."
+1
Level 80
Mar 25, 2017
Not incorrectly, just differently used than in Hebrew.
+5
Level 57
Jul 13, 2016
Could you accept Ramazan or Ramzan in addition to Ramandan? And Jehad for jihad? Thats the way they are spelt in the Indian Subcontinent.
+5
Level 60
Jun 13, 2020
I totally agree. Multiple spellings for Arabic words should be used because the translation of phonetics from Arabic to English is done very poorly.
+2
Level 79
Jul 15, 2016
God's mercy: the unearned withholding of punishment. God's grace: unearned favor. The quiz definition could use some tweaking, but it's no big deal. (but it is)
+2
Level 51
Aug 12, 2017
Technically, the Hanukkah candelabrum is called the hanukiah. The typical menorah actually has 7 candleholders and was used during the Temple periods while the hanukiah has 9 and is used for Hanukkah. If you want to be more accurate for the menorah clue, you might consider just saying "Jewish candelabra" instead.

Also, I had always heard "edict" for papal decrees, never bull. Might "edict" be acceptable? Or is that not specific enough?

+1
Level 71
Jan 14, 2018
You haven't had anyone be picky about the Buddhist question yet, so I'll jump right in! :-D The second definition given for "lama" as "head of a monastery" is problematic (although "spiritual leader" is fine). It dates back to the time of total Western misunderstanding of what lamas actual were in Tibetan Buddhism (as evidenced by its early misnomer of "Lamaism"). Monastery abbots are all lamas, but not all lamas are abbots. A better definition would be "spiritual leader, or guru, in Tibetan Buddhism". And if you take my advice this won't matter, but monastery is spelled wrong ;-). Thank you for being so patient and such a good sport toward all of us!
+1
Level 71
Jun 13, 2020
I respectfully (and annoyingly) renew my comment about lamas not being synonymous with heads of monasteries; there are multiple orders of magnitude more lamas in the world than there are monasteries. (We just call heads of monasteries “abbots”.) Phrasing like this would be very precisely accurate: “A spiritual leader or respected dharma teacher in Tibetan Buddhism”. If you wanted, you could also add “guru” as a sorta-synonym; it’s not a perfect translation (gurus are VERY high lamas,), but it might make the question a little easier (maybe?).

It looks like you got your definition from Brittanica, but I’m going to argue that my source is better :-) I have been a Tibetan Buddhist most of my life, and actually lived in a monastery (as an ordained monastic!) for a couple of years!

But in the likelihood that you’re not gonna change the clue, maybe at least correct the spelling of monastery? Yer a peach. ;-D

+1
Level 58
May 9, 2018
Would dalai lama work for lama?
+2
Level 63
May 28, 2018
The Dalai Lama is himself a lama, but it'd be a folly to call all the lamas Dalai Lamas.

You see, the Dalai Lama is a jolly lama because he's the highest lama of them all.

I hope this clears up all of your melancholy lama drama.

+1
Level 39
Jun 16, 2018
...he's an eagle lama having reached the top of the lama tree...no pun intended...
+2
Level 64
May 24, 2018
I accidentally spelled "lama", "llama"
+1
Level 74
Jun 13, 2020
Karma in the Hindu tradition does not mean "What goes around, comes around". Can you maybe add, that this is the Western form of it?

Also maybe the rebirth questions could be rephrased, as most Buddhist schools believe in reincarnation but not in souls.

+1
Level 67
Jun 17, 2020
serious question; what gets reincarnated according to them then? obviously not the body and if not the soul then what? If nothing returns is it not just a "fresh" birth?

Maybe it is about the word soul here? and how that is interpreted?

Ps reincarnate literally means to be made flesh again/given a body again. So something has to be made flesh again. (And the general definition for soul is everything besides the body, your carnal/physical form)

and if it is just about basic energy or similar concepts, maybe a better word would be re-purposing? ;)

+1
Level 66
Jun 13, 2020
Does the test a first time. Then tries to learn some stuff (without checking every answer just yet). Does it couple times more. Then checks his stats on the test.....the first one i know, right from the start, is appearently the least guessed one (of those I knew), the papal bull. Makes complete sense. xD

Can't help wondering though, if out of my interest in religion from a social perspective (I am personally atheist/anti-theist) helps me know more terms? Most people i know who are religous hardly know any of the words from their own or others faiths (except for ones we have gotten to know all to well over the last decades, because of over-exposure of such terms such as jihad).

+1
Level 72
Jun 15, 2020
TL;DR?
+1
Level 45
Jun 13, 2020
Can you change the hint for "Messiah"? I thought you were talking about Elijah the Prophet, and messiah is neither a concept nor a word that is exclusive to Judaism.
+1
Level 67
Jun 17, 2020
zebra: horse-like animal with stripes

"but a horse is not the only animal that exists!""It is not even the only animal with stripes" ...

+1
Level 59
Jun 13, 2020
The Pope might make declarations through a number of different documents, each of which are promulgated for specific purposes: Apostolic Constitutions, Encyclicals, Motu Proprios, Apostolic Exhortations, Bulls or Decretals, Addresses, Rescripts, or Briefs.
+2
Level 67
Jun 13, 2020
Please accept hanukiah for menorah.
+2
Level 66
Jun 13, 2020
In these comments: "everything on this quiz is kind of wrong."
+1
Level 69
Jun 13, 2020
As a protestant, I find it amusing that a Papal decree is known as "bull"...
+1
Level 70
Jun 15, 2020
The Indian religious belief has a couple issues. It lines up more to the western bastardization of the word than representing what it really means. I'd argue that word is inextricably linked to the concept of rebirth, with bad or good intentions leading to bad or good rebirths, respectively. "What goes around comes around" is really not an accurate portrayal of it, but a Western oversimplification of the concept. Also, more countries than just India have religions that have this concept. It's debatable whether this was originally from Hinduism at all.
+1
Level 66
Jun 16, 2020
Hey Quizmaster -- friendly reminder that the menorah clue is still unfixed!
+1
Level 56
Apr 22, 2021
For 'The promised savior of the Jews' could you accept 'a very naughty boy'