Three Letter Answers #3

Try to guess these answers that are only three letters long.
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: December 29, 2021
First submittedDecember 29, 2021
Times taken18,051
Average score66.7%
Rating4.36
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Hint
Answer
Baby goat
Kid
Pandora opened one
Box
Most common word in English
The
Japanese alternative to a handshake
Bow
Fruit of the Ficus carica tree
Fig
Currency of South Korea
Won
What Noah built
Ark
Snake that bit Cleopatra
Asp
Latin for "king"
Rex
Japanese ornamental carp
Koi
French for "water"
Eau
Half of a pint
Cup
Hint
Answer
James Bond film: "No Time to ___"
Die
One of the four elements in ancient Greece
Air
Atlas component
Map
Gluttony, lust, or pride, e.g.
Sin
Word that follows traffic, printer, or strawberry
Jam
Mind this in the London Underground
Gap
Something messy banned by Singapore
Gum
Squid's defensive mechanism
Ink
To ___ is human. To forgive, divine.
Err
Opposite of wane
Wax
Keeps a grenade from exploding
Pin
Spare the ___, spoil the child
Rod
+1
Level 83
Dec 29, 2021
Nice quiz. Not sure I get the "London underground" one. Does that refer to the gap between the train and the platform? Is London notorious for having a particularly hazardous one? Isn't any potential gap something to be minded in any subway?
+13
Level 81
Dec 29, 2021
Whenever you go on the Tube you are told by the tannoy to 'mind the gap', the phrasing and intonation of which has somehow gained a certain fame. I have to admit I wouldn't have thought it exclusive to London, indeed I'm sure it's said on the overground railway all over the country, but I imagine international tourists know it from London alone.
+4
Level 67
Apr 24, 2022
Like so:

(Also, from Wikipedia: "The phrase was first introduced in 1968 on the London Underground in the United Kingdom. It is today popularly associated with the UK among tourists because of the particularly British word choice (this meaning of the verb mind has largely fallen into disuse in the US).")

+1
Level 78
Apr 24, 2022
Brit here - it really is quite specific to the London Underground. You might hear longer versions ("please mind the gap between the train and the platform when boarding") in railway stations elsewhere in the country, but that particular "Mind The Gap" on its own is very much a tube thing.
+1
Level 65
Apr 25, 2022
In Madrid they say (in Spanish) "Take care to not put your foot between the train and the platform." Same idea, but no fancy catch phrase.
+3
Level 59
Apr 24, 2022
"please mind the gap, between the train and the platform. this is a central line train to: Ealing Broadway."
+14
Level 42
Dec 30, 2021
Liked the quiz but the "half a pint" question is very USA. As far as I know only the Americans use the measure of cups and most of the rest of the world have to look up the conversion to millilitres, fluid ounces or whatever they use. Litre is probably the most common measure for liquids worldwide.

Of course it could just be sour grapes because that's the only one I couldn't get.

p.s. Mind the Gap refers to the space between the train and the platform edge. It can be quite large where the station is on a bend. Falling in the gap accounts for about 300 accidents and several fatalities every year. (I cannot find precise figures so have used a few general reports.)

+6
Level 70
Dec 30, 2021
You could say something like, “Half a US pint, or 250 mL elsewhere”
+2
Level 76
Jan 5, 2022
Indeed, Australia uses metric cup = 250 mL
+3
Level 67
Jan 7, 2022
To be fair, the 'mind the gap' question is very UK
+1
Level 34
Apr 24, 2022
I feel like minding the gap is a universal thing? lots of places have metros, trains, etc. and you need to mind the gap on all of them...
+1
Level 67
Apr 24, 2022
some of tunnels and in london are up to 100 years old and these lines were built to follow the curves of the streets above which means some platforms are very bendy resulting in quite large gaps between the platforms and the trains
+1
Level 78
Aug 30, 2022
I can't see most countries using the instruction "mind" - elsewhere it would be "Watch out for the gap" or "Caution - gap" - something like that.
+1
Level 66
Apr 24, 2022
I figured it meant to not stand to close to the person next to you.
+2
Level 32
Apr 24, 2022
I guess familiarizing oneself with US measurements would make you better at trivia, as would knowing a slogan from the London subway. It’s all part of the challenge.
+6
Level 72
Jan 10, 2022
Should specify half of a *US* pint, which is nearly 100ml less than a UK pint; imperial cups aren't used much (or at all?) in cooking outside the US. Elsewhere people are going to be a bit stumped by that one as it is, so best give that little extra info to show what it's about.
+2
Level 73
Jan 19, 2022
Easiest quiz of my life 3:22 remaining
+1
Level 60
Apr 24, 2022
Agreed. 3:27 for me.
+1
Level 48
Apr 27, 2022
it was easy. except I somehow missed "the". i think I do not understand english enough
+1
Level 68
Feb 15, 2022
I have never understood cups in US and Australian recipes. It is surprisingly difficult to find a specific equivalent in Imperial or metric measures when you look it up.

It has always seemed a strange method of measurement to me as a cup of granulated sugar will surely not weigh the same as a cup of icing sugar? And packing butter into a cup? As for eggs in a cake...

Still, I can see the advantage if you don't have scales and I assume you could actually use any size cup for any one recipe which would be useful if you wanted to make a bigger cake!

+3
Level 72
Apr 24, 2022
Using a scale and doing it by mass does make a lot more sense, but the cup method works well enough. A recipe will usually tell you what sort of sugar to use, so you shouldn't generally need to worry if a cup of granulated is the same as a cup of powdered. If you buy regular, mass-produced butter, it comes in standard sized sticks that are each equal to half a cup, and the wrappers are usually marked off for quarters and eighths, and in tablespoons. For eggs, recipes will simply tell you how many eggs to use, so no cups are required at all!
+1
Level 60
Apr 24, 2022
It's a measure of volume, not weight. And as you suggested, using volume is practical, because as long as the proportions remain the same, one can use any cup to measure. Not everyone has a kitchen scale, but everyone has a cup.

As the previous poster said, normally one doesn't "pack butter into a cup," but uses the printed measurements on the wrapper. But if you had to pack butter into a cup to get the right amount, you could do it.

+2
Level 81
Apr 24, 2022
Pandora's box is obviously the popular term, but you could add jar. Box came about through a translation error.
+3
Level 68
Apr 24, 2022
Placing an "it" in front of "keeps" in the grenade clue would have made it much easier for me.
+1
Level 68
Apr 24, 2022
Agreed. I thought the question was asking for a verb.
+1
Level 64
Apr 25, 2022
doh I was thinking of the Titan not the reference book
+1
Level 61
Apr 27, 2022
So, after years of reading my mothers perfume "eau de parfum" I often wondered if there was a dog one.

"eau de puppy" "eau de chiot"

+1
Level 48
Apr 27, 2022
I. MISSED. THE. HOWWWWWW
+1
Level 71
Apr 30, 2022
Without further clarification, "half of a pint" could refer to "pot", which is a measure of beer in parts of Australia equalling half of a pint.