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U.S. States with the Most Expensive Home Prices

Can you guess the states of the U.S. that have the highest median home values?
According to zillow.com as of January 31, 2024
Based on the estimated value of all homes, whether they are for sale or not
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: February 20, 2024
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First submittedSeptember 14, 2016
Times taken86,659
Average score80.0%
Rating4.42
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Value
State
$828,058
Hawaii
$750,709
California
$586,204
Massachusetts
$563,764
Washington
$527,413
Colorado
Value
State
$501,653
Utah
$497,292
New Jersey
$480,428
Oregon
$450,431
New York
$445,263
New Hampshire
+64
Level ∞
May 14, 2022
Insane. These prices are up about 50% since the last update two years ago.
+4
Level 52
Sep 14, 2016
shocked by the answer to 266,400
+7
Level 65
Nov 30, 2016
Why would you not just write Alaska!? :S
+27
Level 59
Nov 30, 2016
Avoiding spoiler?!
+8
Level 75
Nov 30, 2016
To keep the cheaters who read the comments from getting the answer.
+3
Level 36
Jul 17, 2018
or new york
+2
Level 49
Mar 4, 2024
SPOLIERRRRRRRR
+5
Level 68
Nov 30, 2016
Not really shocking if you visit. Everything is expensive there. Median incomes are also high in Alaska.
+4
Level 74
Nov 14, 2018
Even less shocking if you live there. There's a chronic housing shortage in northern communities, in both the USA and Canada. Can't speak to Greenland, but I suspect it's similar.
+15
Level 70
May 20, 2022
I'm mostly shocked that $266,400 made this list 6 years ago. That's not far off of making the 10 cheapest states list now...
+3
Level 76
Sep 15, 2016
Surprised to see Alaska there. Is it because a lot of building materials need to be imported? Surely the land itself is quite cheap?
+2
Level 77
Sep 15, 2016
Probably, maybe also why Hawaii is up at the top. I wonder if it's also considered to be "exotic" to live in Hawaii, driving up the cost
+13
Level 49
Nov 30, 2016
Costs skyrocket when EVERYTHING must be imported.
+25
Level 60
Nov 30, 2016
Hawaii is at the top for many reasons: 1. It's a tropical paradise, 2. It's an island chain with limited land available for building houses and the land itself is extremely expensive, 3. Everything has to be imported and from a great distance, 4. Houses might need to be built to code to withstand earthquakes, typhoons, tsunamis and volcanoes. The more housing codes you have, the more expensive the final product is.
+5
Level 80
Nov 30, 2016
Land in Alaska can cost a lot, as the vast majority is federal, state, or native lands.
+7
Level 68
Nov 30, 2016
it's not a shortage of land, though. Even if you buy land, it is expensive to hire the labor to build something. Don't forget you might also have to build a road and pay for electric poles if you want to be on the grid.
+5
Level 74
Nov 14, 2018
jamed is correct. It's not about the land, it's about materials and labour, and thinking about hookups if you're not in town. Not to mention that the terrain and weather means you can't build all year round and permafrost is a logistical consideration.
+5
Level 65
Oct 25, 2016
+7
Level 71
Nov 21, 2016
All of these are bordered by water, except CO. So the next best thing after the beach is epic mountains.

...makes sense. Except i'd choose mountains over the beach any day.

+10
Level 32
Nov 30, 2016
That's why Washington is awesome, it has mountains and beaches!!
+8
Level 69
Jan 2, 2017
But Colorado has sunshine all year round where Washington has rain, rain, and more rain ;-)
+4
Level 74
Nov 14, 2018
Yeah but ya don't have to shovel the snow...
+1
Level 72
Sep 11, 2023
CO was the only landlocked state on here in 2016? Interesting to see how the answers have changed over the years then.
+5
Level 49
Nov 30, 2016
Maybe I've watched too many episodes of House Hunters....
+5
Level 52
Nov 30, 2016
Mostly blue states... just saying. Who are the "rich fat-cats" now?
+6
Level 66
Nov 30, 2016
Blue states with the bluest parts being the places with the highest land costs eg NYC, San Francisco, Boston. Thinking people have noticed this trend. Since having families tends to induce some people to become more conservative the idea is that higher land prices = delayed family formation = more liberal population, though this theory has not been lab tested, for obvious reasons
+5
Level 73
Dec 1, 2016
No it's not stupid. Liberal states create more land use restrictions, reducing housing supply, driving costs up. Obviously the choice they've made, and that's their choice to make. But it's not stupid to understand it.
+7
Level 67
Aug 23, 2020
Land use restrictions have very little to do with it. I live in one of the nicest neighborhoods in Chicago, where a two-bedroom condo costs around $550,000. It has nothing to do with land use restrictions. In fact, there are new high-rise condos popping up on every corner. The high price is a result of basic supply-and-demand. I live in a beautiful neighborhood, close to downtown, with parks every block and Lake Michigan ten minutes' walk away. So a lot of people want to live here. So the cost goes way up. It's the same in the New York City suburb where I grew up. There just isn't as much land to develop because it's so densely populated, and people want to be near New York City and in a nice suburb. I don't think land use restrictions matter.
+18
Level 69
Jan 2, 2017
Or, you could argue (also with only correlation behind you and not causality, like most of the rest of these given "reasons") that the blue states are the more expensive states because liberals are more educated and thus can afford to live in the most costly places. See what you can do with statistics? Then again, did anyone stop to notice that the more expensive states are kinda just simply the most desirable ones? They all have natural beauty and/or a great geographical location working for them.
+8
Level 30
Apr 20, 2018
Natural beauty is prevalent throughout the entirety of the USA, not just cities!? I agree with some points made here (cities are more expensive, blue states have better geographical location) but it definitely has something to do with blue states' tendencies to create legislation that has the effect of raising house prices (environmental regulations, higher housing standards, higher closing costs, land use regulations, etc.) It has nothing to do with 'liberals are more educated' -stop being so stuck-up. Liberalism certainly is not a measure of intelligence.
+4
Level 81
Jul 17, 2019
Liberal States would also tend to have better education, services, etc... along with higher property taxes to provide those items. There is a quiz on highest taxes per state that would make a good comparison.
+6
Level 69
Aug 23, 2020
Uh, lmiller, did you happen to notice the whole part about, “See what you can do with statistics?” Meaning: Just as various and sundry “conclusions” can be drawn from any set of given data, so can any of us schmucks here on JetPunk take quiz results and postulate an air-tight(!) theory as to why they are that way. It has nothing to do with being stuck up, but thanks for both proving my point as well as being the best r/woooosh candidate in this entire thread.
+3
Level 59
Aug 23, 2020
Wait, so you were making a joke out of your argument that seemed to be thought out in a serious way? or do you just misunderstand r/woooosh. I thought you made 2 good points in your argument, one about how these are all theories, and another about how these places may be blue, but they're also places of great beauty.
+3
Level 48
Mar 17, 2019
Mostly places with jobs that pay the most. So?
+3
Level 65
Nov 30, 2020
blue states have cities, red states have farmland and provide food and other stuff for the country while cities provide stuff like software and brands
+6
Level 84
May 16, 2022
Yes, of course. California doesn't have any agriculture and Florida and Texas really need to get themselves some cities so they can provide some "software and brands".
+2
Level 74
Nov 30, 2016
I once went to San Diego and was explaining to a local couple that it's not uncommon to find smaller houses in my hometown of Des Moines for around $50,000. They would not believe me until I pulled up actual listings. Now I see why that was so shocking.
+2
Level 60
Nov 30, 2016
Never remember Hawaii and Alaska for any of these. Always just darting around the lower 48 trying ever more desperate guesses - "maybe houses are really expensive in Alabama!" and then there they are, Hawaii and Alaska.
+7
Level 66
Dec 1, 2016
Surprised Connecticut isn't on the list. Lots of rich NYCers reside there.
+3
Level 69
Jan 2, 2017
I too was surprised about the absence of Connecticut – and also Virginia, for those same reasons you gave. (Aside from the entirety of Northern Virginia being a DC-commuter bedroom community, most of the top five counties with the highest average home prices are there.) But then I remembered that both CT and VA still have a LOT of very rural areas, and like, Mennonites and stuff. ;-D
+3
Level 68
Dec 2, 2016
The median home value in Seattle is $611,500. Seattle home values have gone up 14.4% over the past year, per Zillow.

We bought our place 25 years ago, before the increase. No fun thinking about moving in retirement.

+1
Level 84
May 16, 2022
I would think you'd be kind of excited, assuming you might consider moving in retirement to a lower cost state or country. That equity can go a long ways.
+3
Level 48
Nov 12, 2018
I am not surprised by this - but reminds me once again, how much cheaper houses are in the USA compared to UK. I live in a pretty average UK house - and it is probably worth around $500,000.
+1
Level 63
Jun 13, 2022
Out of curiosity, what part of the UK are you in? I am American and I find housing prices across countries to be really interesting.
+2
Level 82
Nov 14, 2018
So this data is just the average price of everything from studios to mansions?
+2
Level 95
Nov 15, 2018
Boggles my mind how low some of these are. My tiny condo is more than most of these, makes me sad.
+2
Level 11
Dec 22, 2018
Not american, but I somehow managed to get 8, do not know how?
+2
Level 66
Dec 22, 2018
One theory: A quick typist can enter an awful lot of states at random in the time allotted. I suppose there is no way to factor in a penalty for incorrect answers.
+2
Level 66
Dec 22, 2018
Perhaps a maximum number of "tries".
+2
Level 78
Dec 22, 2018
As a Realtor, I'd love know where you got your incorrect statistics - ah, just noticed it says Zillow. I didn't bother to even try when the two states with the highest housing costs did not appear. Zillow's data is notoriously wrong. Try Realtor.com or a government site. Zillow's "zestimates" on houses not currently for sale or not sold recently are notoriously high and incorrect. It even overpriced the owner of Zillow's own home by almost $2 million dollars. The only accurate measure of value of home is comparisons to homes sold recently (banks calculate between 90 to 180 days past). The numbers you have are unsupportable.
+8
Level ∞
Dec 22, 2018
Post your sources. There is no way that two states not on this list have higher average house prices than California or Hawaii. Zillow isn't always correct, but it's good enough on average.
+6
Level ∞
Dec 22, 2018
Maybe you are thinking about cost/square foot, or about land prices. That would be different and obviously New York would be higher.
+2
Level 81
Dec 24, 2018
I assume it is based on sale prices that Zillow has compiled (a statistic they track), rather then "Zestimates." So these numbers should be fairly accurate.
+6
Level 72
Sep 11, 2023
"Zestimate" sounds like a trendy new word for gaydar
+2
Level 59
Dec 24, 2018
I find it hard to believe Virginia isn't in the top ten. Homes here in Northern Virginia are SO expensive. I guess the rest of the state balance the prices.
+3
Level 82
Dec 26, 2018
The suburbia/redneck frontier keeps getting pushed further west and further south (used to be Centreville and Woodbridge, now it's around Warrenton and Fredericksburg) but get past that and it gets pretty cheap. That's most of the state.
+4
Level 48
Mar 17, 2019
Surprised Connecticut and Rhode Island aren't here.
+2
Level 67
Jul 17, 2019
7.
+2
Level 27
Jul 17, 2019
Small spelling request: Please accept Massechussetts for Massachusetts.
+3
Level 59
Aug 23, 2020
Massechusetts is accepted, it's the double ss that messes it up.
+5
Level 67
Aug 20, 2020
American houses are dirt cheap compared to many other countries.
+3
Level 72
Aug 21, 2020
Maybe compared to our income, sure, but both SF and NYC are among the most expensive places to live in the world in terms of housing costs. Places like Singapore can feel more expensive since the housing costs almost as much but the average salary is like a third that of SF/NYC.
+7
Level 84
Aug 21, 2020
Utah??
+5
Level 82
Aug 23, 2020
Was surprised to see them above Connecticut
+3
Level 88
Aug 23, 2020
Large family size often equals a larger house. I don't think Utah would be on this list if you were comparing, say, the average price of a three bedroom, two bathroom house.
+1
Level 88
May 23, 2022
2022 update: Utah would be here by virtually any measure now. Home prices are through the roof...
+1
Level 45
Feb 20, 2024
I live in a 4 bedroom 3 bathroom house and its worth 950,000. It was built in 2003 and we just finished our backyard. I am also in the more expensive part of the state and on the way to my school there are five $4,000,000+ homes and many other lots for houses just as big to be built.
+4
Level 45
Aug 23, 2020
even without large families Utah is crazy expensive!! Scenery and weather is what you're paying for more than for the size of the home.
+3
Level 68
Aug 23, 2020
i cant right for the life of me the word "Massachussets"
+4
Level 59
Aug 23, 2020
Write*, and Massachusetts*. Don't worry, you'll get to a point where it's easy to do that
+2
Level 35
Aug 25, 2020
i swear i wrote oregon but it didn't go through 👁💧👄💧👁
+2
Level 38
Aug 26, 2020
I'm sure a lot of people will be surprised with Utah at 7. But it has the highest rate of population growth in the nation, highest median home size, land availability near urban centers is increasingly scarce due to growth and geography, plus it's gorgeous scenery. Won't be surprised if it breaks the top 5 soon.
+4
Level 46
Aug 26, 2020
I need to get out of Jersey...
+3
Level 57
Nov 30, 2020
Massachusetts here :\
+2
Level 46
Apr 14, 2021
as a californian i can confirm
+1
Level 39
Apr 24, 2021
Got 'em all! Was suprised when Utah was a correct answer...
+2
Level 63
Apr 26, 2021
10/10. Got Utah couple second before the end of the time
+2
Level 59
Jun 16, 2021
i was typing utah while it was ending ;(
+1
Level 59
Feb 20, 2024
got utah
+1
Level 28
Jun 22, 2021
This is confusing me because the house I have is the price on New York, But my state I live in is on cheapest home prices!
+4
Level 65
Dec 30, 2021
As a canadian, these "expensive houses" still seem very cheap
+2
Level 85
Jun 7, 2022
No kidding -- Ontario as a province is near a million for a house. Within the GTA, the price climbs. If you want a three bdrm home in a Toronto suburb, you need a rich childless aunt to die. I live in one of the poorest neighbourhoods in one of the poorest cities and my 3 bdrm house is worth more than average state price except Hawaii and California.
+1
Level 89
May 14, 2022
Alaska, thou disappointeth.
+3
Level 78
Jun 7, 2022
Well, the entire state of Alaska last sold for $7.2 million, so I'm not surprised it missed the list.
+1
Level 82
Jun 7, 2022
Wasn't Maryland on here before? Maybe home prices there are falling relative to the rest of the country. And did Idaho just shoot up the rankings? Don't remember them before and that seems by far the oddest inclusion. No surprises in the top 5, though.
+1
Level 56
Jun 7, 2022
Annoying Californians are ruining my state. I swear, I see more Californian license plates than Idaho ones. Where I live, I used to be able to buy a two-story, three-bedroom house for around $150,000, now you can hardly find a two-bedroom house for below $300,000!
+1
Level 48
Jun 7, 2022
Didn't see Idaho coming.
+2
Level 89
Jun 7, 2022
Suddenly moving back in with your parents doesn't sound like a bad idea anymore.
+1
Level 93
Oct 18, 2023
The United States is definitely the global outlier in this regard. In fact in most of the world, moving out of your parents home at age 18 is unusual. I'm fortunate that my parents didn't kick me out the second high school ended unlike some of my classmates.
+1
Level 63
Jun 10, 2022
obviously, a lot of these depend on where in the state you live. I'm from Massachusetts and my house where it stands is below average but if it was near or in Boston, it would be well above average
+1
Level 75
Jun 11, 2022
Idaho? Seriously?
+1
Level 66
Apr 21, 2023
Yup, seriously. I would like to move back when I retire but unless things change, I havent been able to find a reasonably priced home anywhere in the State. Very different than when I grew up there.
+1
Level 34
Jul 30, 2022
I'm SHOCKED New York isn't on this list tbh.
+1
Level 68
Apr 23, 2023
Upstate New York dragging the average down I guess.
+1
Level 67
Oct 11, 2023
Missed Idaho
+1
Level 72
Feb 20, 2024
So Florida is the place to go to if you decide to migrate to the US from Europe?
+2
Level 73
Feb 21, 2024
Not necessarily. As with every state, there are pros and cons. Here in Florida, prices are on a steep incline, making it one of the more expensive, even though it's not within the top 10. I wouldn't base it solely off of average home price anyway. If you are, then Oklahoma, West Virginia, and Mississippi are better options for you.
+1
Level 55
Mar 4, 2024
Yeah, maybe Oklahoma if you can live with the 'culture' there. Double that with a much worse job market in WV and MS. Florida is a good bet, particularly if your ethnic background if hispanic, many places you'd feel more at home.

Oh, just noticed the person asking the question based on the name may be Greek. I would suggest Atlantic coast, not necessarily Florida. There is a big Greek population around the mid-atlantic from North Carolina through Maryland. The owner of the Baltimore Ravens for example was Greek.

+1
Level 55
Mar 4, 2024
I wonder where washington DC would be? My guess is between California & Hawaii in the #2 spot.
+1
Level 67
Mar 4, 2024
Quick Google search says it would be #3, at about $600,000 per home.