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Two Letter Answers #2

Can you guess these answers that are only two letters long?
Answer must correspond to highlighted box
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: November 9, 2022
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First submittedDecember 1, 2014
Times taken51,854
Average score70.8%
Rating4.31
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Clue
Answer
Chemical symbol of lead
Pb
Spaniard's yes
Si
To exist
Be
I ♥ this city
NY
Alien in a bicycle basket
E.T.
Thatcher or Churchill
PM
What Tyson did to Spinks
KO
This symbol: @
At
Toronto's tallest tower
CN
__ and behold
Lo
Its parliament is in Strasbourg
EU
Consume too much medication
OD
Clue
Answer
In the year of our Lord
AD
Marvel's greatest rival
DC
Author Milne
A.A.
A billion bytes
GB
Déjà __
Vu
Country code for Germany
DE
Second-most common last name in China
Li
Stereotypical ending of a Canadian sentence
Eh
Science fiction author Wells
H.G.
Male pronoun
He
Prefix which can come before noble or nite
Ig
Nyet, nein
No
+2
Level 74
Jan 25, 2015
Reading "deja" in your clue, I wondered what language it was and I didn't think at all it could be the French word "déjà" ! ;-) Even in English, Wikipedia writes the acute and grave accents in "déjà vu"... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D%C3%A9j%C3%A0_vu
+3
Level ∞
Oct 14, 2016
Added the diacritics.
+15
Level 71
Feb 18, 2017
Rufy gets my golden nitpickers award for this week.
+12
Level 51
Feb 18, 2017
Not really. To those fluent in other languages, leaving off the diacritics often renders the word unrecognizable. They aren't merely "decorative". In some languages, the diacritics create entirely new letters, though that is not the case here.
+6
Level 87
Sep 3, 2018
Cool story written in English, just like the quiz.
+3
Level 24
Jan 25, 2015
Accept 'Ay' for the stereotypical ending of a Canadian sentence please.
+1
Level 45
Jan 26, 2015
they say eh ... and about is said aboot :)
+2
Level 82
Nov 9, 2022
Except that Canadians don't say aboot. I think some Scottish people do, but I have no idea how that got associated with Canada.
+1
Level 48
Nov 27, 2022
@sumguy Let me introduce you to a man by the name of J.J. McCullough...
+1
Level 80
Jan 26, 2015
Like Ay Caramba?
+2
Level 63
Feb 11, 2018
Agreed. Even though Canadians may say 'Eh,' most of the world pronounces it with an 'Ay' due to its similar sounding in dialects.
+2
Level 45
Jan 25, 2015
Randy Newman's song I Love L.A. is what I thought for "I love this city" clue
+1
Level 71
Nov 27, 2022
LA was my first guess.
+5
Level 82
Jan 25, 2015
the "I heart this city" is too vague to know that it specifically refers to New York City, otherwise a good quiz.
+10
Level 72
Jan 26, 2015
It's almost as if QM knows that the marketing gimmick began in NY and tons of other places copied it after its success...
+1
Level 78
Oct 14, 2015
Doesn't help that "I NY" was a campaign for the state, not specifically the city.
+5
Level 48
Feb 18, 2017
And yet 91% of people specifically typed "NY" and got the right answer...
+2
Level 67
Feb 18, 2017
New York, got it in 1 second, and I live in New Zealand. I would LOVE to visit New York one day!
+2
Level 26
Jan 29, 2015
In Europe is the country code for Germany not just D?

It is on cars anyway.

GB = UK

IRL = Ireland

D = Germany

DK = Denmark

+2
Level 64
Jul 15, 2015
Well, but D is only one letter. And I think they're going by this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_3166-1_alpha-2
+1
Level 81
Feb 19, 2017
It's worldwide vehicle registration code for Germany, not just in Europe. But there are also ISO two-letter and three-letter codes.
+1
Level 60
Feb 21, 2017
For some reason I read "Spaniard's EYES" instead of "yes". I was confused.
+2
Level 66
Feb 2, 2020
Am I the only one who assumed country code meant the code typed in before phoning someone in said country from abroad? Like the US is 001 and China is 86? I didn't know the answer (it's 49), but I spent my remaining seconds guessing random 2 digit number combinations. Is it possible to change the clue to country abbreviation instead of country code?
+3
Level 76
Feb 7, 2020
But it doesn't ask for the international dialling code, it asks for the country code. Which is DE.
+3
Level 81
Nov 9, 2022
It's a two-letter quiz, not two-character. That should be enough to read the clue correctly.
+2
Level 83
Nov 10, 2022
Usually when a comment on the internet begins with "Am I the only one who..." the answer is: "No, literally everyone else did too." But in this instance the answer is, "Yeah, probably."
+1
Level 43
May 5, 2021
+3
Level 83
Nov 10, 2022
I got most of these almost instantly, except for "To exist", where I got stuck on "is" and "am" for a while.
+1
Level 65
Dec 3, 2022
Which, since they are conjugates of to be, are valid answers. Question should be modified or those answers should be accepted.
+4
Level 89
Nov 10, 2022
Guess I have to be "that guy" who points out that a GB isn't precisely a billion bytes - it's something like 1.074 billion. Could be corrected by adding "roughly" as a qualifier.
+1
Level 62
Nov 14, 2022
Or, "roughly 1.074 billion bytes."
+1
Level 66
Nov 27, 2022
2 ^ 30 bytes.
+1
Level 68
Nov 28, 2022
It depends. It can be either, depending on the context and who's doing the calculation (e.g. the hard drive vendor is using 1 GB = 10e6 bytes, while your "disk free" calculation is using 1 GB = 2^30 bytes). Knuth suggested using different prefixes for the base-2 analogs, e.g. "Kibi", "Meba" and "Giba" or something like that, to differentiate, which never really caught on. There's no real consistency; I've seen people even mix these bases, so 1 kB = 1024 bytes but 1MB = 1000 kB. It's the wild west.
+6
Level 65
Nov 27, 2022
"Ig" isn't a prefix to nite, it's just part of the word, and it bears no meaning by itself, unlike in the "ignoble" example, in which means "the opposite" or just "not".
+1
Level 26
Nov 27, 2022
I didn't know ignoble was a word
+1
Level 48
Nov 27, 2022
Sorry to nitpick, but in Sinitic languages it's more common for the family name to come before one's given/chosen name. It'd be more correct to replace "last name" with "surname"