thumbnail

Two Letter Answers #4

Can you guess these answers that are only two letters long?
Answer must correspond to highlighted box
Quiz by Quizmaster
Rate:
Last updated: November 9, 2022
You have not attempted this quiz yet.
First submittedDecember 1, 2014
Times taken60,428
Average score58.3%
Rating4.15
3:00
Enter answer here
0
 / 24 guessed
The quiz is paused. You have remaining.
Scoring
You scored / = %
This beats or equals % of test takers also scored 100%
The average score is
Your high score is
Your fastest time is
Keep scrolling down for answers and more stats ...
Clue
Answer
London is its capital
UK
Turntable user
DJ
Chemical symbol of gold
Au
Gulf of Mexico oil spillers
BP
South Vietnamese communist guerrillas
VC
There's 100,000 in a km
cm
Surgeon's room at the hospital
OR
Poet Eliot
T.S.
Security wing of the Nazi party
SS
Vancouver is its largest city
BC
Initials that mean "for example"
(not i.e.)
e.g.
Another term for a resume
CV
Clue
Answer
Sumerian city with a big ziggurat
Ur
Record that spins at 33 ⅓ rpm
LP
Letters at the end of a letter
P.S.
Hugs and kisses
XO
Country code of Switzerland
CH
Video with at least 921,600 pixels
HD
"Yes", in Germany
Ja
Opposite of them
Us
Light frequency just above visible
UV
Fee fi __ fum
Fo
Rapper Cool J
LL
Used to indicate a former name
(French for born)
+10
Level 76
Mar 28, 2015
Can't believe I typed ya for ja, then gave up when it didn't work. Sigh.
+2
Level 63
Apr 25, 2019
Das Beaken!
+13
Level 54
Mar 28, 2015
ie. for "for example"? I know the meaning is slightly different, but I feel like they're usually used interchangeably.
+8
Level 83
Mar 28, 2015
That's what I typed as well. Couldn't figure out why it wasn't being accepted.
+30
Level 72
Apr 12, 2018
What you guys need is a Latin teacher!
+47
Level 58
Jan 13, 2019
i.e. and e.g. are both Latin abbreviations. E.g. stands for exempli gratia and means “for example.” I.e. is the abbreviation for id est and means “in other words.”

They are different things, sheesh

+12
Level 74
May 11, 2021
I've always read i.e. as "that is".
+30
Level 57
Mar 28, 2015
ie = specifying/clarifying what is meant

eg = giving one or more examples of what is meant

+4
Level 83
Jun 18, 2017
to specify or clarify what is meant one gives examples..
+11
Level 81
Apr 17, 2021
no, you clarify by explaining
+2
Level 83
May 12, 2021
which you can do by giving examples
+6
Level 62
May 20, 2023
I will now take anything written by Kalbahamut with a very large grain of salt, i.e table salt.

There is no shame in admitting you don't know something, e.g. people won't think your dumb just because you get Internet Explorer confused with Equatorial Guinea.

+2
Level 62
May 22, 2023
As much as I very much appreciate your perfect example of the difference between the two, it is then slightly undermined by your saying “your dumb” when you meant “you’re dumb”.
+19
Level 80
Dec 8, 2021
They are absolutely different, and using them wrong can substantially alter the meaning.

For instance, "please secure a high profile perfomer, i.e. Madonna" means this person literally wants ONLY Madonna to perform. No-one else will do.

"Please secure a high profile performer, e.g. Madonna" means this person wants a performer of the kind of profile Madonna has. But Britney Spears or Rihanna would do just as well.

So only e.g. means "for example". i.e. derives from "Id Est", which translates as "that is", and is a completely different term.

+3
Level 69
May 20, 2023
How delightful - kalbutternut being wrong, and persisting in being wrong by insisting he's right. I shall treasure this.
+3
Level 78
Mar 28, 2015
I went with i.e. as well. When it didn't work I assumed there was an error in the quiz and moved on, never even considering other options. And Quizmaster you KNOW that if kalbahamut and I agree on something it just HAS to be right!!
+51
Level ∞
Apr 16, 2021
Not in this case, i.e. you are both wrong.
+29
Level 74
Apr 16, 2021
Some people are wrong on this one, e.g. kalbahamut and eric29cocoanuts.
+4
Level 76
Aug 27, 2022
They're not wrong, though. Language and common vernacular is ever-changing and evolving. Origins become kind of unimportant. I.E. is used to mean e.g CONSTANTLY, probably more than e.g. At a certain point, the common use of a word within a society actually becomes correct, even if it is technically wrong. Language is silly like that.
+3
Level 74
Nov 12, 2022
Constantly? You’ll have to cite some kind of evidence rather than explaining some vague notion. I know the Chicago Manual of Style says there’s a difference. Academic papers use the terms frequently and correctly, since academics generally prefer people to know exactly the meaning of their sentences. Ergo, this isn’t something likely to change through corruption—they’re used too much by the academic community.
+2
Level 69
May 20, 2023
All I know is that if anyone agrees with kalbumahat, they're both wrong.
+17
Level 67
Mar 30, 2015
The two abbreviations, e.g. and i.e. are latin phrases. I.e. stands for "id est" and basically means "that is", while e.g. stands for "exempli gratia" and means "example given".
+19
Level 42
May 14, 2015
They are not interchangeable.
+16
Level 69
Sep 3, 2018
"a lot" and "alot" are used interchangeably too, and yet one is still totally incorrect.
+6
Level 84
Apr 20, 2021
Yes, they're used interchangeably, but incorrectly.
+2
Level 88
May 11, 2021
Ray Bones: "Let me explain something to you. Momo is dead, which means that everything he had now belongs to Jimmy Cap, including you. Which also means, that when I speak, I speak for Jimmy, e.g., from now on, you start showing me the proper effing respect." Chili Palmer: "E.g. means 'for example.' What I think you want to say is i.e." Ray Bones: "BS. It’s short for ergo." Chili Palmer: "Ask your man." Bodyguard: "To the best of my knowledge, e.g. means for example." Ray Bones: "E.g., i.e., eff you! The point is that when I say 'jump,' you say 'ok,' okay?"
+1
Level 68
May 20, 2023
Love this comment--and you beat me to the punch by two years. Good idea to bleep out some of the saltier dialogue.
+3
Level 87
May 11, 2021
An easy way to keep them straight is to think of e.g. as "example given," and i.e. as "in essence." This is not really what the initials stand for, but is their general meaning.
+1
Level 57
Aug 26, 2016
i.e could also mean 'for example'. i.e is short for 'Id est' which in Latin means "That is/in other words/that is to say"
+15
Level 59
Jun 19, 2017
"That is" is not the same as "for example" - there is a clear distinction between the two.
+1
Level 74
Jun 18, 2017
Viet Cong was the name adopted by Americans for the group that called itself, in its abbreviated English form, the National Liberation Front, or NLF. With that in mind, in Vietnam the thing that Americans call the Vietnam War is called the American War.
+3
Level 63
Jun 18, 2017
My brain annoys me. When the quiz says: turntable user, I think of trains.
+4
Level 66
May 14, 2021
I saw turntable user and immediately thought LP. That didn't work, so I moved on and found record spinning at 33 1/3. Went back and had enough time to think about who might use a turntable. Sometimes you just need a reset button.
+9
Level 42
Jun 18, 2017
The abbreviations i.e. and e.g. are not interchangeable, i.e., one should not be considered an equivalent replacement for the other. Since "i.e." stands for "id est" which is "that is" in Latin, one could substitute a similar phrase, e.g., "in other words", but not "e.g."
+1
Level 58
Jun 18, 2017
got all of them first try!
+1
Level 71
Sep 6, 2017
Memphis definitely. KC needs to figure out something else to be known for because barbecue and blues are already taken.
+1
Level 74
Apr 17, 2021
Negro Leagues Hall of Fame. Jazz Hall of Fame.
+1
Level 38
Feb 16, 2018
wouldn't i.e. be accepted for the abbreviations of "For example"?
+21
Level 71
May 11, 2018
This has been done to death already and the answer is no.
+1
Level 42
Sep 3, 2018
ie for example?
+12
Level 74
Dec 19, 2018
It's been addressed in other comments, but no. "eg." means "for example," while "ie." means "in other words."
+1
Level 75
Oct 5, 2018
Resumé means summary. C.V. mean curriculum vitae. These two meanings are entirely different. Needs a different clue, I would suggest.
+6
Level 83
Jan 13, 2019
They way they are used today in English is entirely the same.
+3
Level 72
Apr 25, 2019
Eh, not really- CV is academia, resume is corporate world, and they communicate different things. I wouldn't send a resume to an academic job, or a CV to a corporate job. That being said, the clue is clear enough so that it's obvious what the answer should be.
+6
Level 80
Nov 9, 2022
Not true where I am. 'CV' is the usual term in both academic and corporate worlds.
+1
Level 69
May 20, 2023
They're the same thing.
+3
Level 37
Dec 14, 2018
^ Agree. A Resume is a short summary of your work and academic accomplishments (today it is recommended that it not be more than one page long) ; a Curriculum Vitae is a more thorough delineation of your life experiences.
+10
Level 78
Apr 16, 2021
That''s not the case in the UK where only CV is used for any job application, corporate or academic. Resumé isn't really used here.
+1
Level 84
Apr 16, 2021
Should "SD" also work for the security wing of the Nazi party?
+2
Level 66
May 12, 2021
Not really. The SD was the intelligence wing of the SS, so a wing of a wing rather than a wing itself.

SA should probably work though.

+1
Level 84
Nov 9, 2022
I've always believed in transitivity of wings.
+1
Level 84
Apr 25, 2023
There's a great line in the 1978 TV drama Holocaust where Erich Dorff says to Reinhardt Heydrich, "I have trouble keeping the SS, the SD, and the Gestapo separate."

Heydrich replies "It doesn't matter. I run them all."

+2
Level 93
Apr 17, 2021
Can you accept xx as well as xo? It's far more common in the UK.
+2
Level 74
May 20, 2023
You're missing the hugs!
+1
Level 74
Apr 17, 2021
I kept trying LP (and EP) for Turntable user. When those didn't work, I went with RR. Alas.
+1
Level 83
Apr 18, 2021
"London its its capital"
+2
Level 67
Apr 23, 2021
*U're
+1
Level 74
May 11, 2021
Sumerians were horrible at spelling.
+1
Level 65
May 11, 2021
I hate having to rush a quiz. Offer more time
+1
Level 66
May 14, 2021
I thought there was plenty of time. Couldn't get 3 answers on my first pass, but had time to go back and think about all 3 (and get them right) on my second pass and still had 0:56 left on my clock.
+1
Level 70
May 11, 2021
I feel like SA should be accepted along with SS. Same with ie for eg even though I know that one is very controversial.
+4
Level 64
May 11, 2021
Operating Theatre?
+1
Level 46
May 11, 2021
fun quiz eh
+1
Level 55
May 12, 2021
i cant look at this thumbnail without immediately thinking "shoutout to his family"
+2
Level 61
May 16, 2021
Shouldn't ER (emergency room) work for surgeon's room at the hospital? I've heard that many times, but I'm not sure I've ever heard the initialism that is listed as correct.
+3
Level 74
Feb 19, 2023
But the emergency room isn't where surgeons work. Someone goes to the ER, and if it turns out they need surgery then they're brought to the surgeon in the OR.
+2
Level 76
Aug 27, 2022
You really should accept i.e. You're doubling down by refusing to (seemingly just to be annoying and pretentious in true Jetpunk fashion) and it's dumb.

At a certain point, when something is SO commonly used, it overrides the technicality and the pedantry. I.E is used more often than e.g. You should accept i.e. It's a perfectly acceptable answer for this question and you know it.

But you won't change your mind. You'll likely just reply something snarky and dismissive like you did above instead of considering it from another angle.

+11
Level 80
Nov 9, 2022
They. Mean. Different. Things.

Just because a lot of people get it wrong, doesn't mean it suddenly doesn't matter. I've sat in presentations where I had to check with someone what they actually meant by 'i.e.', because their correct or incorrect usage would fundamentally alter what they were trying to say.

I'm all for people just using plain English and saying 'for example' or 'that is', so perhaps e.g. and i.e. will die out and that's possibly for the best. But in the meantime - they mean different things.

+4
Level ∞
Nov 10, 2022
Yeah, people should stick to plain English. But if you are going to use Latin - use it correctly.
+2
Level 69
Nov 13, 2022
It's phrased as a specific translation question. There's just no room for argument.
+2
Level 63
Dec 9, 2022
I Literally thought that Literally meant Literally until I met a teenager.
+5
Level 93
Nov 9, 2022
Hiya Quizmaster. Could 'OT' ('Operating Theatre') be made an acceptable type-in? In the UK, we don't refer to it as an 'Operating Room'.
+3
Level ∞
Nov 10, 2022
Okay
+1
Level 63
May 20, 2023
weeeeeell, except in the UK we don't use OT as a term (at least I've never heard it). ER is either A&E (Accident and Emergency)or 'Casualty' and the operating theatre is just 'theatre'.
+3
Level 78
Nov 16, 2022
"er" should definitely be accepted as an answer for "letters at the end of a letter". XD
+1
Level 71
Nov 17, 2022
‘“Letters at the end of a letter” WTH does that mean, what kinda weird clue is that?’ (Sees the answer) …..Oooh, duh.
+1
Level 41
May 20, 2023
"Yes in Germany" you probably mean German, since that is what the language is called, Germany is a country
+1
Level 73
May 20, 2023
I would like to see the parenthetical "i.e." removed, just to see the comments from those who think they are interchangeable.
+2
Level 67
May 20, 2023
You can see them above from before the note was added
+2
Level 39
May 20, 2023
Would hugs and kisses not be 'OX'? 'XO' is kisses and hugs.
+1
Level 77
May 20, 2023
I tried LP for 'turntable user' :)