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U.S States with the Fewest Cows

Tragically, some states are desperately short of bovines. Try to name the ten U.S. states which have the lowest cattle populations.
Source: USDA, January 2023 estimates
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: April 3, 2023
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First submittedApril 3, 2023
Times taken15,608
Average score80.0%
Rating4.59
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Cattle
State
3,000
Rhode Island
12,000
Delaware
18,000
Alaska
24,000
New Jersey
31,000
New Hampshire
Cattle
State
38,000
Massachusetts
47,000
Connecticut
74,000
Maine
144,000
Hawaii
165,000
Maryland
22 Comments
+1
Level 72
Apr 3, 2023
Rhode Island last?
+1
Level 59
Apr 3, 2023
yes
+7
Level 78
Apr 3, 2023
That was much easier than the states with the most cows.
+20
Level 89
Apr 3, 2023
States that don't have a lot of space for cows don't have a lot of cows.
+11
Level 78
Apr 25, 2023
And Alaska
+9
Level 72
Jun 16, 2023
No space for warm cows.
+6
Level 74
Apr 4, 2023
A ridiculously easy quiz for a New Englander. As a kid, I would marvel at the number of cows one could see in Vermont.
+1
Level 76
Jun 16, 2023
But, good for you, Vermont.
+1
Level 85
Apr 4, 2023
I aced both of the recently-reset "cow quizzes," with a good deal of time left over. Guess I know my cows!
+6
Level 74
Apr 27, 2023
This quiz was udderly delightful. Truly a mooving experience.
+2
Level 93
May 16, 2023
My mind cannot comprehend the idea that there are at least 165k cows in Vermont.
+1
Level 48
Jun 16, 2023
Think Ben & Jerry’s! That’s the only reason I didn’t type it
+2
Level 68
Jun 16, 2023
We must all work to end this tragedy.
+2
Level 67
Jun 16, 2023
Every state needs at least 1 billion cows.
+1
Level 59
Jun 16, 2023
Agreed. They are desperately short of bovines. I say we drive a few million cattle on the I-90 and I-95. Anyone have a ferry we can borrow for Alaska and Hawaii?

Edit: So....

50 young cows fit in a cattle car. This requires 20,000 train cars for 1,000,000 cattle. The average train has 100 cars. So 200 trips for one train. 1,072.6 miles (of driving distance, which is good enough to account for the fact that the rail line is not a straight line) between Amarillo, Texas, and the port at LA. At 30 mph, a round trip takes 71.5 hours, which we will round to three days. This will take 600 days, or closeing (a coined word i have invented to mean nearing to, with close + ing) two year journey. However, with 4 trains donated by some kind JetPunker, (meaning 2 trains running to California at all times), this will take only 150 days (if running at all times) to get the cattle to the Pacific. For Hawaii/Alaska alone. Not including Alaska/Hawaii.

+1
Level 59
Jun 16, 2023
So a medium sized livestock carried holds say 4,000 cattle, on the higher end due to them being young. This is only 80% of the cattle of one train. So, 250 trips from a livestock carrier to Hawaii. LA-Honolulu at 10 knots is 12.6 days at sea. Combining ship loading at both ports, and the round trip, it is safe to say 27 days, with 1.8 added for port activities. We will not need to hire truck to ship cattle from the railyard to port, as LA port has a yard. This is 6750 days for one ship. Unacceptable. Currently 150 ships are in LA port. Therefore...if some kind JetPunker donates 150 ships or we hire out other ships, 45 days. Let's say 50. If we overlap both parts, get some more trains....50 days total. Not counting the 5 day cattle meet and greet for them to meet each other. Once in Honolulu, they will will spread across Hawaii. Kahoʻolawe is completely abandonded due to lack of water (we must build irrigation for them), so this is 28780.8 acres already. However, a cow requires 1 acre.
+1
Level 59
Jun 16, 2023
So Molokai has 260 sq mi of land and is already cattle ranching. This is 166400 more acres, and 166400 more cows. 195180 cows have homes already. 804820 to go. Another 465408 can be had by evicting 168,307 people from Maui. Niihau has 84 people. Evicting them yields just 294932 cows to go. Lanai is 98% owned by a man who bought it from a Dole banana company spin-off. Evicting 3,367 people later, and eminent domain, 89920 more cows. The rest can be spread across the rest of the islands. Also, many small islands.

Mahalo,

-Neokimiuma

(based on a wikipedia page for hawaiianization, hawaiian dont got a word for it

+1
Level 72
Jun 16, 2023
This is assuming that all the trains stay on their tracks. But there are approximately 1475 derailments per year in the US. Now, cows are hardy beasts and they’d probably be OK. But if just one goes off the tracks at a junction, you’re left with a hell of a lot of mooers getting very hot and bothered in close quarters, backed up for miles on end behind the derailment. Clearly, the only solution is a squadron of B-52 bombers and as many massive parachutes as it’s possible to manufacture (I’d imagine this will be outsourced to Bangladesh but it’s important to ensure quality control with cow parachutes - a faulty one can mean disaster, not just for the cow, but possibly for any person(s) beneath the cow).
+1
Level 59
Jun 17, 2023
Lots of shipping time from Bangladesh and also we would need to get B52s, which I calculate to be harder to procure than trains and ships. At all times there must be an extra ship and trucks going along side them. I have only 1,000,000 bovines procured. I can't afford to loose any. We could also drive the cattle in one massive cattle drive on I-10.
+1
Level 71
Jun 16, 2023
Makes me sad that his 'New' Jersey hasn't kept up the association with cows that the old Jersey has
+1
Level 53
Jun 17, 2023
i think that there deserves to be a cow badge at this point
+1
Level 76
Jul 17, 2023
I'm surprised 12,000 cows fit in Delaware.