The Last Ship by J.R.R. Tolkien (Part 1)

Fill all the lyrics on this beautiful poem by The Professor, for the first part.
Quiz by TarsTarkas
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Last updated: January 27, 2021
First submittedJanuary 27, 2021
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Average score43.7%
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Answer
Fíriel
looked
out
at
three
o’clock:
the
grey
night
was
going;
far
away
a
golden
cock
clear
and
shrill
was
crowing.
The
trees
were
dark,
and
the
dawn
pale,
waking
birds
were
cheeping,
a
Answer
wind
moved
cool
and
frail
through
dim
leaves
creeping.
She
watched
the
gleam
at
window
grow,
till
the
long
light
was
shimmering
on
land
and
leaf;
on
grass
below
grey
dew
was
glimmering.
Over
Answer
the
floor
her
white
feet
crept,
down
the
stair
they
twinkled,
through
the
grass
they
dancing
stepped
all
with
dew
besprinkled.
Her
gown
had
jewels
upon
its
hem,
as
she
ran
down
to
the
Answer
river,
and
leaned
upon
a
willow-
stem,
and
watched
the
water
quiver.
A
kingfisher
plunged
down
like
a
stone
in
a
blue
flash
falling,
bending
reeds
were
softly
blown,
lily-
leaves
were
sprawling.
A
Answer
sudden
music
to
her
came,
as
she
stood
there
gleaming
with
free
hair
in
the
morning’s
flame
on
her
shoulders
streaming.
Flutes
there
were,
and
harps
were
wrung,
and
there
was
sound
of
singing,
Answer
like
wind-
voices
keen
and
young
and
far
bells
ringing.
A
ship
with
golden
beak
and
oar
and
timbers
white
came
gliding;
swans
went
sailing
on
before,
her
tall
prow
guiding.
Fair
folk
out
Answer
of
Elvenland
in
silver-
grey
were
rowing,
and
three
with
crowns
she
saw
there
stand
with
bright
hair
flowing.
With
harp
in
hand
they
sang
their
song
to
the
slow
oars
swinging:
”Green
Answer
is
the
land,
the
leaves
are
long,
and
the
birds
are
singing.
Many
a
day
with
dawn
of
gold
this
earth
will
lighten,
many
a
flower
will
yet
unfold,
ere
the
cornfields
whiten.”
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