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Modern-Day Landlocked Countries Which Once Had Coastlines

This is an attempt at remaking Baxtergrad's Landlocked Countries That Once Had a Coast, with suggested improvements from the comments of that quiz, particularly from the user Tisco.
Quiz by TheLetterP
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Last updated: September 9, 2023
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First submittedSeptember 8, 2023
Times taken51
Average score76.5%
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Succession From Modern States
Coastline Lost In...
Country
As...
Territory Lost
1879
Bolivia
Republic of Bolivia
Litoral Department
1960
Mali
Mali Federation
Senegal
1993
Ethiopia
Transitional Government of Ethiopia
Eritrea
2008
Serbia
State Union of Serbia and Montenegro
Montenegro
De Facto Succession From Modern States
1870
Vatican City
State of the Church
Lazio
Joint Succession From Modern States
1918
Austria
The Kingdoms and Lands Represented in the Imperial Council (Austria-Hungary)
Littoral and Dalmatia
1918
Hungary
Lands of the Crown of Saint Stephen (Austria-Hungary)
Modrus-Fiume and Lika-Krbava
Dynastic, Linguistic, or Ethnocultural Succession
66 BCE
Armenia
Kingdom of Armenia
Phoenicia, Syria and Cilicia
1013
North Macedonia
First Bulgarian Empire
Lezhë and surroundings
1276
Czechia
Kingdom of Bohemia
The Windic March and Friuli
1383
Luxembourg
County of Luxembourg (Under House of Luxembourg)
Brabant
1386
Mongolia
Northern Yuan
Modern eastern Hebei and Outer Manchuria
1463
Azerbaijan
Qara Qoyunlu
Rize and surroundings
1538
Moldova
Principality of Moldavia
Southern Bessarabia
1624
Zimbabwe
Kingdom of Mutapa
Modern southern Mozambique
1650
Malawi
Kingdom of Maravi
Modern Quelimane and surroundings
1758
Afghanistan
Durrani Empire
Kalat
3 Comments
+1
Level 80
Sep 8, 2023
Once again, this is not my quiz idea - Baxtergrad created and researched it first, and you should check his quiz out in the description. I believed there could have been improvements made to the presentation, however.

Near-Answers:

Luxembourg - Brabant was once under the House of Luxembourg between 1355 and 1383, but effective control was part of 'Luxembourg' as a family rather than a state. I might still add this later.

Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan - Possible successors (as the Kazakh and Uzbek Khanates) to the Golden Horde, which had a large Black Sea coast, but this requires quite a few mental leaps.

Azerbaijan - Azerbaijani was the language of the rulers of Qara Qoyunlu, which held coastal territory in Georgia and Trebizond, and the country's capital was in Tabriz, part of historical Azerbaijan. Also a potential addition, left out right now due to being closer to a Persian predecessor.

+2
Level 80
Sep 8, 2023
I've decided that if I'm letting Bohemia count for Czechia and Mutapa count for Zimbabwe then Luxembourg and Azerbaijan should count too.

Also updated with better dates.

+1
Level 80
Sep 9, 2023
And updated again, with a decision that will likely annoy some.

Here's why I think North Macedonia is a valid successor to the First Bulgarian Empire. By it's collapse, the empire had been ruled for over 40 years from cities within modern North Macedonia - Skopje, then Ohrid, then Bitola. Modern Macedonian is directly descended from the empire's official language of Old Church Slavonic.

(Also if North Macedonia loses descendancy from the Macedonian Empire I think this is a good consolation prize.)

Meanwhile, adding onto the honorable mentions list is Andorra, which, while claiming to be the last descendant of the Spanish March, still doesn't count. The Spanish March was less a territorial entity and more an alliance network and buffer zone.

Belarus too joins under the Principality of Polotsk. Despite a few maps online, I can find no reliable sources on them ever controlling Riga or Lithuania.