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Third Most Popular Language in Every Country (with a map)

Think naming the most and second most popular language in every country is too easy? Try to fill in the map of the world by naming the third most popular language in each country!
Source- the gate website article and other Wikipedia websites. The data is mainly derived from the CIA World Factbook and Ethnologue
Focusing on L1 languages (people's native language) if there is data (if there is no data for the L1, we would look at L2 languages), for the more thorough methodology, see the comment section
For the creole/patois languages, please be specific and answer either "parent language + creole" or "origin + creole". Also, don't forget the Sign Languages
Quiz by fromTaiwan
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Last updated: May 6, 2021
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First submittedMay 5, 2021
Times taken334
Average score50.0%
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Country
Language
Afghanistan
Uzbek
Albania
Aromanian
Algeria
Shawiya (Berber)
Andorra
Spanish
Angola
Kongo
Antigua and Barbuda
Spanish
Argentina
English
Armenia
Russian
Australia
Arabic
Austria
Serbian
Azerbaijan
Armenian
Bahamas
Haitian Creole (French Creole)
Bahrain
Persian
Bangladesh
Sylheti
Barbados
French/Spanish
Belarus
Romani
Belgium
German
Belize
Belizean Creole (English Creole)
Benin
Bariba
Bhutan
Lhotshamkha (Nepali)
Bolivia
Aymara
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Croatian
Botswana
Kgalagadi
Brazil
Hunsrik
Brunei
Chinese
Bulgaria
Romani
Burkina Faso
Fula
Burundi
Swahili
Cambodia
Cham
Cameroon
French
Canada
Punjabi
Cape Verde
English
Central African Republic
Sango
Chad
Sara
Chile
German
China
Wu
Colombia
Paez
Comoros
Comorian
Costa Rica
Cabécar
Croatia
Italian
Cuba
Galician/Corsican
Cyprus
Romanian
Czech Republic
Polish
Democratic Republic of the Congo
Swahili
Denmark
Greenlandic
Djibouti
Somali
Dominica
Kokoy Creole (English Creole)
Dominican Republic
English
East Timor
Makasae
Ecuador
Shuar
Egypt
French
El Salvador
Qʼeqchiʼ
Equatorial Guinea
Bube
Eritrea
English
Estonia
Ukrainian
Eswatini
English
Ethiopia
Somali
Federated States of Micronesia
Kosraean
Fiji
Hindi–Urdu
Finland
Russian
France
Picard
Gabon
Myene
Gambia
Wolof
Georgia
Armenian
Germany
English
Ghana
Fante
Greece
Bulgarian
Grenada
Hindi/Bhojpuri
Guatemala
Q’eqchi’
Guinea
Maninka
Guinea-Bissau
Pular
Guyana
Wapishana
Haiti
Spanish
Honduras
English
Hungary
German
Iceland
Danish
India
Marathi
Indonesia
Dutch
Iran
Kurdish
Iraq
Turkmen
Ireland
Scots
Israel
English
Italy
French
Ivory Coast
Dyula
Jamaica
Jamaican Sign Language
Japan
Korean
Jordan
Adyghe
Kazakhstan
English
Kenya
Kalenjin
Kiribati
Tuvaluan
Kosovo
Serbian
Kuwait
English
Kyrgyzstan
Russian
Laos
English
Latvia
Latgalian
Lebanon
English
Lesotho
Zulu
Liberia
Grebo
Country
Language
Libya
English
Liechtenstein
Turkish
Lithuania
Polish
Luxembourg
French
Madagascar
English
Malawi
Chinyanja
Malaysia
Chinese
Maldives
Arabic
Mali
Fula
Malta
Italian
Marshall Islands
Japanese
Mauritania
Soninke
Mauritius
French
Mexico
Ch‘ol
Moldova
Gagauz
Monaco
Italian
Mongolia
Russian
Montenegro
Bosnian
Morocco
Tamazight (Berber)
Mozambique
Tsonga
Myanmar
Chinese
Namibia
Khoekhoe
Nauru
Nauruan Pidgin English
Nepal
Bhojpuri
Netherlands
Limburgish
New Zealand
Samoan
Nicaragua
Sumo
Niger
Zarma
Nigeria
Yoruba
North Korea
Japanese
North Macedonia
Turkish
Norway
Sami
Oman
Balochi
Pakistan
Saraiki
Palau
Filipino
Panama
Guaymí
Papua New Guinea
Hiri Motu
Paraguay
German
Peru
Aymara
Philippines
Chinese
Poland
Kashubian
Portugal
Mirandese
Qatar
English
Republic of the Congo
Suundi
Romania
Romani
Russia
Chechen
Rwanda
English
Saint Kitts and Nevis
American Sign Language
Saint Lucia
French
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
Vincentian French Creole
Samoa
Samoan Sign Language
San Marino
English
São Tomé and Príncipe
Cape Verdean Creole (Portuguese Creole)
Saudi Arabia
Mehri
Senegal
Pular
Serbia
Bosnian
Seychelles
French
Sierra Leone
Temne
Singapore
Malay
Slovakia
Romani
Slovenia
Serbian
Solomon Islands
’Are’are
Somalia
Italian
South Africa
Afrikaans
South Korea
English
South Sudan
Zande
Spain
Galician
Sri Lanka
English
Sudan
Nubian
Suriname
Sranang Tongo (English Creole)
Sweden
English
Switzerland
Italian
Syria
Armenian
Taiwan
Hakka
Tajikistan
Kyrgyz
Tanzania
Arabic
Thailand
Mandarin
Togo
Kabiye
Tonga
Niuafo’ou
Trinidad and Tobago
Tobagonian Creole (English Creole)
Tunisia
Berber
Turkey
Zaza
Turkmenistan
Uzbek
Tuvalu
Samoan
Uganda
Soga
Ukraine
Romanian
United Arab Emirates
Hindi
United Kingdom
Irish
United States
Chinese
Uruguay
Portuguese
Uzbekistan
Tajik
Vanuatu
English
Vatican City
French
Venezuela
Warao
Vietnam
French
Yemen
Rāziḥī
Zambia
Tonga
Zimbabwe
English
+1
Level 58
May 5, 2021
Methodology:

The data (as of 2019) mainly focus on L1 languages, i.e., people’s primary languages to make sure we were only including languages that were actually used on a daily basis.

We started out by gathering data from the CIA World Factbook and listed the second most commonly used languages in all the countries we could, and then filled in any gaps and double-checked the information with the world language website, Ethnologue.

Whenever any data from Ethnologue didn’t match up with the CIA’s data (as it includes L2 languages as well), we swapped it for the Ethnologue data.

In some rare cases, there is no data for the second commonly used languages in a country for the two website mentioned above, I would check it with the Wikipedia page and other websites, which might include the L2 languages.

It is very likely that some answers are not correct, please feel free to correct me in the comment section!

+1
Level 73
May 6, 2021
There's something with Chinese and Mandarin here.

Wu, Hakka and Mandarin are all parts of the Chinese linguistic family and Chinese itself is technically not a language.

When people say Chinese, they generally refer to Mandarin. Most speakers of other Chinese languages are also fluent in Mandarin and frequently communicate in that (as a native Wu speaker, I can confirm that) so I think it's fair to change all answers currently labelled as "Chinese" to Mandarin

Regardless, nice quiz

+1
Level 58
May 6, 2021
I know there is something inconsistency between Chinese and Mandarin.

Unfortunately, we are mainly focus about the L1 languages and some countries’ government just count all Chinese language, including Mandarin, Cantonese, Wu, Hakka, Southern Min, etc. as one single language. It is impossible to set them apart and not everyone speaks Chinese languages as a first language speaks Mandarin as their first language (Cantonese may be a large amount of number). Hope you would understand!

By the way, I’m from Taiwan, so I could speak two Chinese languages, Mandarin and Taiwanese (Southern Min). I want to learn Yue and Wu though