thumbnail

Famous "Effects" in Science and Psychology

With the clues to help you, name these famous "effects".
Quiz by interopia
Rate:
Last updated: October 30, 2021
You have not attempted this quiz yet.
First submittedOctober 29, 2021
Times taken141
Average score33.3%
Report this quizReport
5:00
Enter effect here
0
 / 12 guessed
The quiz is paused. You have remaining.
Scoring
You scored / = %
This beats or equals % of test takers also scored 100%
The average score is
Your high score is
Your fastest time is
Keep scrolling down for answers and more stats ...
Description
Answer
The tendency of any treatment, even an ineffective one, to exhibit results because the recipient believes it will work
placebo effect
Social psychological theory that states that individuals are less likely to offer help to a victim when there are other people present
bystander effect
The process by which radiation from a planet's atmosphere warms the planet's surface to a temperature above what it would be without this atmosphere
greenhouse effect
Snow produced when a cold air mass moves across long expanses of warmer inland bodies of water
lake-effect
The change in frequency of a wave in relation to an observer who is moving relative to the wave source
Doppler effect
Physical phenomenon in which an insulating vapor layer keeps a liquid hovering instead of boiling away rapidly
Leidenfrost effect
Description
Answer
Trope where a caregiver falls in love with his or her patient
Florence Nightingale effect
Psychological phenomenon wherein high expectations lead to improved performance (think My Fair Lady)
Pygmalion effect
Phenomenon that occurs when an attempt to hide or censor information has the unintended consequence of increasing awareness of it
Streisand effect
Phenomenon where a large group of people remember something differently than consensus reality agrees upon
Mandela effect
Cognitive bias that people with low ability overestimate their own ability, while people with high ability underestimate their own ability
DunningKruger effect
A cognitive bias in which consumers place a higher value on products they assemble themselves
IKEA effect
+1
Level 83
Oct 29, 2021