10 U.S. States With The Highest Murder Rates

Name the U.S. states that had the highest murder rates in 2020.
Murder rate = murders per 100,000 residents
Change = change since 2011
Quiz by bobduncan37
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Last updated: November 27, 2021
First submittedJanuary 29, 2017
Times taken37,662
Average score70.0%
Rating4.45
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Murder Rate
% Change
State
15.8
+41
Louisiana
11.8
+93
Missouri
10.6
+33
Mississippi
10.6
+93
Arkansas
10.5
+54
South Carolina
Murder Rate
% Change
State
9.6
+52
Alabama
9.6
+65
Tennessee
9.1
+63
Illinois
9.1
+34
Maryland
8.8
+57
Georgia
+48
Level ∞
Aug 6, 2018
For comparison:

  • El Salvador: 84.8
  • Saint Louis: 59.7
  • Chicago: 28.1
  • New York City: 3.4
  • New Hampshire: 1.3
  • United Kingdom: 1.2
  • Japan: 0.28
+10
Level 91
Aug 7, 2018
Does anyone have an idea of what is it about Japan (the people, the country, politics, etc) that mean the people are, apparently, nicer to each other or at least obviously less violent?
+59
Level 38
Aug 7, 2018
Very restricted immigration and smart and bright native population.
+45
Level 76
Aug 7, 2018
A lot of it is cultural as well. The family structure in Japan is much stronger than in other cultures. I believe that constantly being surrounded by family has a positive impact on an individual that manifests itself in all kinds of ways, including not killing each other.
+51
Level 81
Aug 7, 2018
Might have something to do with guns and swords being mostly forbidden as well: "Japanese law, however, starts with the 1958 act stating that “No person shall possess a firearm or firearms or a sword or swords,” later adding a few exceptions. In other words, American law is designed to enshrine access to guns, while Japan starts with the premise of forbidding it." - Much harder to kill someone with a knife or with bare hands.
+36
Level 63
Aug 7, 2018
Japan has virtually zero immigration from the 3rd world. They have a homogenous population with common values, culture, and respect for one another and their country.
+10
Level 52
Aug 7, 2018
Wiki lists Irvine, CA as having pretty much the lowest rates for all categories, with a violent crime rate less than half of the next lowest city.

The 2010 census shows Asians accounted for around 45% of the city's population then and likely the majority now.

+16
Level 67
Aug 8, 2018
I visited Japan for two weeks less than two months ago, and the efficiency, organization, and common decency among the people is positively mind-blowing. I befriended some people and I was so awestruck by their society that I just outright asked them how they did it, and their answer was just that, more than any other ethic, they are taught from birth to always be polite and to never be the person that disrupts harmony. They don't get all rah-rah about jingoism (I saw one Japanese flag while I was there -- at the Hiroshima memorial). They don't fuss about silly things. They just handle their business. It was positively remarkable.

Having said that, one can't ignore that Japan is ethnically homogenous and geographically isolated. That makes it much easier to run a society. The pressure to be "proper" (in behavior and life) also causes a lot of depression and suicide (as the numbers show). But still, it's my favorite place I've ever been. I can't wait to go back.

+3
Level 66
Aug 8, 2018
Murder rate is something that doesn't necessarily reflect on a society as a whole. Murders are such a rare event even in the areas with the highest murder rates that the cause for each murder has to be something that is one-off, or at least very rare. It is possible that a high murder rate reflects generally low levels of morality in a society, but it is also possible that it reflects a polarised society. Emphasis on the community as a whole and fitting in might reduce or increase polarisation, although if it is relevant here it would seem to reduce it. There could also be other factors at play here.
+6
Level 73
Aug 31, 2018
In the US more immigration correlates to lower crime rates. I'd also argue that it is a cause.

Japan and Korea share many characteristics, and one of them is low crime and murder rates. One reason in Korea is cctv cameras EVERYWHERE. Also constant watching by others in person.

I think also the suppression of losing one's temper is considered admirable (although Koreans are hot-tempered) so blustering in a bar fight and brandishing a weapon would be OTT here, unlike in the US.

+7
Level 58
Aug 31, 2018
Because it is a homogeneous society and culture. Say what you will about all the joys of diversity, blah blah, but there's no question that in cultures/countries where everybody lives by the same standards/rules/expectations people seem to be easier to govern (control?), can communicate better, etc....
+10
Level 61
Aug 31, 2018
Japanese citizens are more likely to commit violence against themselves. Very high suicide rate.
+28
Level 46
Aug 31, 2018
Wasn't too long ago they were murdering each other or invading other Asian countries and murdering them. It's not like they had a flood immigration throughout those years. There's been plenty of immigration and migration throughout Europe and those homicide rates are very low as well. To solely put the reasoning on immigration is inaccurate.
+1
Level 90
Oct 16, 2019
The best summary of the Japanese attitude I have heard is "respect for others". In many situations Japanese will go out of their way to show that respect and tolerate something that they may disagree with.
+8
Level 71
Dec 15, 2019
Probably a big factor is that Japan is much older. Younger people are much more likely to murder or be murdered.
+4
Level 77
Dec 15, 2019
It's a self-fulfilling prophecy. Immigrants are often seen as dangerous/dirty/lazy/taking our jobs, which puts them in a worse, and often separate position in society. Even without outright racism and intention, because of language and cultural barriers and lack of connections, they are more likely to end up perspectiveless, and from there crime is a likely next step. However, depending on the kind of society, this trend can be minimized, and because of other positive effects, immigration can still be a net gain for both sides. If we even want to consider gains when it comes to this issue.
+3
Level 67
Dec 16, 2019
Japanese people have low immigration due to them being very xenophobic to foreigners. When I was last in Japan (Yokohama) I walked down the street and literally everybody looked at me and pointed and said stuff I didn’t understand because I’m Russian
+4
Level 67
Dec 20, 2019
I need to clarify that I was not talking about immigrants with my comment re homogeneity making things easier, or trying to draw a direct cause-effect connection re multiculturalism and gun violence. I was speaking first about how Japan's culture is built around harmony and cooperation. I then mused that having a population that is 98% from the same ethnicity likely makes it easier to agree upon what is socially acceptable because those people more likely have the same basic views. To westerners, that sounds like a comment on immigration, but it's not. I just meant that having fewer distinct social groups means fewer opportunities for discord among those groups. I should add both that "easier" does not necessarily mean "better," and reaching consensus more easily is only good if the consensus (and the culture) are built around good ideas. The US had easier consensuses in the 1830's when only one culture, moneyed white men, had a say. But of course those views were not great.
+2
Level 32
Apr 19, 2020
the suicide rate is massive tho
+2
Level 70
Mar 17, 2021
I get what jmellor is saying--it's less a comment on diversity vs. homogeneity and more about cohesion vs. division. Japan can easily avoid ethnic/religious/political/economic polarization because everyone follows the same ideals and the same culture. Polarization isn't the only factor contributing to crime, but when people disagree with each other, it increases the chance of violent conflict and/or radicalizes people until they turn violent.

Of course, you can have a peaceful, non-polarized societies that are culturally diverse too. As wkrpync said above, many of the American cities with the largest immigrant populations (New York, Los Angeles, El Paso) tend to have relatively low murder rates compared to the rest of the population.

Regardless of the possible influence of homogeneity on crime though, the biggest factor behind high crime rates in America are lax gun laws (see my comments below).

+2
Level 70
Apr 19, 2021
I wasn’t entirely surprised to see that so many people jumped on immigration as the most likely cause of the disparity between the USA and Japan. This completely breaks down though as soon as you go deeper than the straight USA vs Japan stats (and it’s not like Quizmaster didn’t provide them). The UK is highly multicultural and has had Commonwealth and EU mass immigration over decades, yet has a lower murder rate than New Hampshire. And I’m fairly certain California has more immigrants than many of the top 10 here, yet doesn’t appear.

The most obvious correlation when looking at this list, plus the extra statistics provided would appear to be poverty. But Mississippi doesn’t appear, which suggests that, as with most things, multiple factors are probably at play and there isn’t a single, simple explanation. But at least we can probably dismiss one simple explanation- can’t blame immigrants for this one.

+2
Level 70
Apr 19, 2021
And also, perhaps the guy who went to Yokohama could maybe think about what he’s saying again? You’ve just called an entire nation 125+ million people xenophobic based on some people saying things which you, by your own admission, couldn’t understand. Now, anyone can do lazy, sweeping generalisations. I won’t, but I know people who would, and I can guess a particular nationality that may come up if I were to ask them “which nationality is xenophobic/racist.”
+2
Level 65
Sep 23, 2021
It's also somewhat misleading to say all Japanese have the same values. I'm not an expert on Japan, but from what I do know I can guarantee there are numerous modern/post-modern subcultures like there are in the United States, and

I would imagine they clash.

Hopefully someone with more knowledge can weigh in on this, but I'm not sure I would jump the gun and call Japan culturally homogenous just because it's ethnically homogenous.

+1
Level 58
Dec 12, 2021
I would have to agree.

There was a gas attack on the subway many years ago that seems to contradict the whole "no one is extremist in Japan" narrative.

I think that Japanese people, in general, are less physically aggressive than are people from other countries.

Coupled with a developed economy and active, funded, law enforcement, and you get one of the lowest recorded murder rates in the world.

Of course, an actual anthropologist would have a much better answer on this.

+1
Level 70
Dec 13, 2021
While Japan having an older population will be a factor, it won't actually be a big factor. Might lower the rate by a few percent, but it's not close to explaining a murder rate 20 times lower than the US.

It's predominantly cultural (putting societal harmony ahead of individual impulses) and legal (restricted access to lethal weapons).

Even though I live in a very safe country (Australia), the level of public safety in Japan is really noticeable, far beyond risk of homicide.

+1
Level 78
Feb 16, 2022
Restricted immigration isn't the key here. Canada has a large immigrant population yet has a low murder rate. The key here is high standards of living and limited social inequality.
+1
Level 45
Oct 22, 2021
this is interesting
+1
Level 27
Jan 16, 2022
that awkward moment when im from chicago...
+15
Level 70
Aug 7, 2018
Even though there are still some pretty violent places in America it's nice to see that overall the murder rate has dropped a lot in most of these states since the 90s. Only if we had more gun control...
+9
Level 77
Aug 7, 2018
Well actually gun regulations are weaker now than they were in the 90s. They don't have much to do with the crime rate.
+11
Level 63
Aug 8, 2018
UK is a good example. They have restrictive gun laws just like Japan but people find a way around it. UK has acid attacks, nail bombs, van rammings, beheadings, knife attacks, hatchet attacks, etc. If somebody wants to cause damage they'll find a way.
+33
Level 66
Aug 8, 2018
The UK still has a considerably lower murder rate than the USA.
+23
Level 72
Aug 8, 2018
If acid, nail bombs, knives, hatchets, etc. are all just as dangerous as guns, then why do people make such a big deal about having guns to protect themselves? Why not just have a knife, if it's equally as dangerous as a gun?
+17
Level 71
Aug 11, 2018
The trouble with your comment 'TinklePork' is that the USA also has Nail Bombs, van rammings, beheading, knife attacks, machete attacks etc. etc. plus a terrible murder rate.
+28
Level 64
Aug 16, 2018
Beheadings! Yeah, they're an everyday occurrence in the UK. You may want to visit sometime. Always useful to base a comment on your own experience and/or on facts.
+30
Level 76
Aug 31, 2018
I don't know about that - I can't seem to get to the shops these days without being beheaded. It's getting really annoying.
+6
Level 79
Aug 31, 2018
You're right to a large extent, Bernard, but recent evidence is showing stricter gun laws do lead to a slightly lower murder rate. That runs contrary to the pro-gun lobby's claims - but its always convoluted as cities with stronger laws are often surrounded by areas with extremely weak laws (ie, Chicago, surrounded by Indiana and Wisconsin's weak laws).

What actually does show more of an impact than anything else is reduced lead exposure - this exposure is known to not only harm intellectual development, but result in more violent tendencies. As we've eliminated leaded gas and leaded paint, lead exposure levels have plummeted, followed by perfectly correlated declines in violent crime rates, delayed by 15-20 years (ie, the time it takes for kids to grow up).

Unfortunately, many poverty-stricken areas never have had good lead paint removal programs. We'd rather spend a fortune to incarcerate them than to fix the problem on the cheap.

+14
Level 77
Oct 25, 2019
I've lived in the UK on and off for nearly half a century, and I've only been beheaded a few times. Funny thing - it grows back slightly different each time
+2
Level 72
Oct 24, 2019
There are more guns in more hands now than there were in the 90s. If we went by your thinking, that it is a gun issue, there would be MORE murders, not less.
+2
Level 67
Dec 15, 2019
This is a simplistic approach though. Gun possession being *a* cause of violence does not mean gun possession is *the* cause of violence. There are other variables at work, so you can't just draw to a direct causation between guns and violence or the lack of violence. If I start eating ice cream everyday, but also start running ten miles daily and cut all soda and white starch out of my diet, I'll probably lose weight. But that doesn't change the fact that ice cream is fatty and makes people gain weight. It's just that there are other variable offsetting its effects. I think this is true of the entire conversation around guns. Both sides fixate on whichever factor is most beneficial to their cause (gun possession or "mental health"), and ignore all the other factors like access to education, community activism, interactions with police, poverty, drug epidemics, etc.
+9
Level 70
Dec 16, 2020
Back when I wrote that comment I didn't write much on JetPunk, so I think it's worth elaborating...

Gun ownership IS directly linked to violence in America. Studies such as this one show the link pretty clearly. Sure it doesn't determine causation, but there's still a pretty strong correlation. In terms of developed Western countries, no one comes close to America's firearm-related death rate.

It's not just a homicide or mass shooting problem either--most suicides in America are committed using firearms, and so gun control would likely cause significant decreases in suicide.

I'm not saying guns are the *only* factor leading to violence in America (as jmellor nicely explains), but it's still absurd to think that guns are not a problem in America.

+9
Level 70
Dec 16, 2020
Building off of that... Australia, after a devastating mass shooting in 1996, introduced very serious and restrictive gun laws, such as bans on semi-automatic rifles, strict background checks, and a government buyback program. Their suicide rate has plummeted and there have been way fewer mass shootings than before the law was passed. If America was even half as strict as Australia, I have a feeling we'd see similar results here.
+1
Level 70
Dec 13, 2021
Australia already had a fairly strict licencing system pre-1996 but the other area that got tightened up was safe storage laws. Guns need to be locked away when not in use, with ammo locked away separately, and no gun safe keys accessible to unlicensed family members.
+21
Level 57
Aug 8, 2018
Interesting how the places with the highest murder rates in the US are pro-gun Southern states. Six are Deep South and only two are fully outside the South (NV and IL).
+16
Level 67
Aug 8, 2018
And Illinois is very likely on the list because of the violence epidemic on Chicago's South Side and West Side, where most of the guns are imported from nearby Indiana, which also has very lax gun laws.
+3
Level 15
Aug 31, 2018
Yeah, I live in Illinois and put it in as a joke, but then it accepted the answer. Then I remembered that Chicago exists.
+14
Level 71
Aug 10, 2018
Also, sadly, poverty, and lack of education (which go together with each other, as well as with crime).
+3
Level 78
Aug 10, 2018
Samiamco, I think you are correct and I think we can add drug dependency/abuse to the list- unless that's what you meant when you said crime. I've lived in five of the states on the list including the only one with an increase and they can be very scary places. I am surprised to see Maryland on here instead of Michigan.
+3
Level 79
Aug 31, 2018
Maryland is on here because of Baltimore - which represents a bit over 10% of Maryland's total pop. Michigan's problematic areas, primarily Detroit, Flint, and Benton Harbor, represent under 8% of Michigan's total pop, and all. So Baltimore, with it murder rate higher than Detroit or Flint or Benton Harbor, has an outsized impact.

Often people hear the news headlines and miss the underlying facts. For example, the city of Detroit is only roughly 1/6th of the total population of Metro Detroit. So they hear about high murder rates in Detroit and conflate that with high murder rates around the entire metro region, when most of it is in fact very safe.

Or they hear about high numbers of murders in Chicago and assume its a complete war zone, when in fact many cities in the US have equally high or higher murder rates (St. Louis, Baltimore, New Orleans, Cincinnati, Cleveland, etc)...

+1
Level 46
Aug 31, 2018
NV (Nevada) is sort of south. Just not south-east. Illinois seems to be the only exception here, probably because of Chicago.
+3
Level 68
Aug 31, 2018
Illinois is also certainly affected by East St. Louis.
+2
Level 87
Oct 16, 2019
Nevada is not considered part of what the U.S. calls the South with a capital S, i.e., the southeast, the old southern part of the country before westward expansion. Hawaii, the most southern state by latitude is not the Deep South.
+3
Level 73
Oct 18, 2019
Nevada is not remotely part of the South. And most of the murders occur in Las Vegas, which is hardly a "red" city. Most of the murders there are either gang related or a result of their wonderful neighbor state releasing dozens upon dozens of felons who then go next door and commit violent crimes.
+1
Level 63
Aug 26, 2019
That’s was my strategy, I just started naming off red states, suddenly I had 8/10. They have a solution to the epidemic though...more guns lol
+1
Level 90
May 1, 2022
Yeah... being red states isn't the common denominator.
+2
Level 77
Aug 8, 2018
Sad that my state of Missouri had an increase. I'm guessing St. Louis is responsible for that.
+2
Level 78
Aug 10, 2018
Ander, I'm sure that St Louis plays a big part in it, but don't forget Kansas City. You recently mentioned a movie, "Winter's Bone" that pretty accurately depicts the conditions that occur in the Ozarks and even our sleepy little Bootheel is experiencing its share of crime. It is indeed very sad.
+1
Level 77
Sep 1, 2018
I found the 2018 FBI crime report for Missouri and it seems we're both wrong. It includes all violent crimes, but I didn't see anything from the KC area. However, St Louis and its suburbs totaled only four, with one, Poplar Bluff, in the Bootheel area. (I know heroin is a problem there.) The remaining ones were in the southwest part of the state - Springfield, Branson, Joplin, Bolivar, and Nevada. As you said, maybe it's the "Winter's Bone" issue of drugs. We own a few acres in the Ozarks and meth is still a real problem over there. I've lived in the Bootheel region all my life except for college years, but I never thought of us as "sleepy". We are rural, but I'd describe us as rowdy rather than sleepy. Boys driving the backroads in their duallys on weekends, drinking, or taking opioids to have a good time, and some dying in the process. The three young men I knew who died of drug overdoses were educated and came from families who were in business or law. Poverty wasn't the reason.
+1
Level 58
Aug 31, 2018
They all have miserably humid and uncomfortable hot weather in the summer---with the single exception of Nevada, which just has plain DRY and uncomfortable hot weather.
+4
Level 67
Aug 31, 2018
Not sure whether the humidity plays a large role, but I do know that in Chicago, where I live, the first nice weekend of the year is usually the most violent. The winters here are long, and once it gets nice, all the kids in crime-ridden areas get outside and get themselves into trouble. There are way fewer murders in the winter than in the summer just because fewer people are outside looking for trouble in the brutal Chicago winter weather. I have no evidence in support, but I suspect the fact that it's always warm in a lot of these places boosts their numbers.
+1
Level 44
Sep 2, 2018
I was a bit surprised not to see Michigan because of the murders in Detroit.
+1
Level 53
Apr 9, 2019
Another easy one. All across the South, mostly.
+2
Level 46
Jul 30, 2019
Is there a link between violence and climate? It seems that most of the countries./ states with warmer climates have higher murder rates. Possibly as simple as ppl spending more time outdoors and more diverse interaction?

Obviously not the ONLY factor but could be a social indicator?

+2
Level 77
Dec 15, 2019
Most of the countries with warmer climates are also poorer, and poverty is a breeding ground for crime.
+2
Level 53
Dec 20, 2019
I don't think it's a factor in that sense, but it is a useful measure of how correlation doesn't always directly equal causation. In Australia the homicide rate always slightly spikes during the summer months. The reason isn't because of the temperatures per se, but because most homicides are domestic homicides, and during summer, families (especially the kids) tend to spend more time around each other.
+1
Level 55
Dec 11, 2021
I think the extreme heat makes people grouchy and short tempered. I live in Baltimore and summers here are miserable. Very hot and humid. Puts everyone in a bad mood. Before you know it an argument has escalated to a shooting.
+1
Level 58
Dec 12, 2021
I don't think so.

Florida and Hawaii are both warm, and neither are on this list.

Southern California is warm as well, and has a relatively low crime rate.

Latin America has a high crime rate, but South Asia does not.

Just some examples that I can think of off the top of my head.

+2
Level 74
Oct 17, 2019
People always talk about how kind Southerners are.....
+9
Level 77
Dec 15, 2019
Maybe 99,9% are nice and 0,1% are murderers?
+1
Level 72
Jun 21, 2022
They're not any kinder than people anywhere else. They're nice to your face, big difference. They're just insidious about their meanness. They smile and bring you a casserole and then turn around and gossip about you and your family and try to start drama as soon as you're out of earshot. Southerners are NOT any kinder than New Yorkers, Californians, etc. Oh, and LOADS of them truly are bigots. It's not just a stereotype. They just hide it well in public and then drop all the vile pejoratives and racial jokes around the dinner table.

Source: Lived in a deep red state for 25 years.

+1
Level 68
Dec 17, 2019
I see comments above regarding low murder rate in Japan. But just out of curiosity what is the murder rate in a place like Saudi Arabia? I’m genuinely asking because I think they have a low murder rate as well but I’m assuming it’s not because of homogeneity as is claimed in above comments for Japan. So what then would be the reason? I’m just trying to suggest that it could be a different angle to debate from.
+1
Level ∞
Dec 17, 2019
The murder rate in Saudi Arabia is quite low, although still 6.5 times higher than Japan. It sounds stupid, but having a low murder rate is about having a low number of murderers. The vast majority of people would simply never commit murder in any circumstance. But if the cultural conditions are right, some people will consider violence. Japan's culture and homogeneity mean they have almost none of those people. But an equally homogeneous society could have an extremely high murder rate if violence was part of the culture.
+1
Level 84
Mar 28, 2022
Homogeneity? I know racists like repeating this word a lot as if it's a good thing or something to strive for. But what does it actually have to do with anything? Singapore has a murder rate just as low as Japan, and it's one of the most diverse least homogeneous countries in the entire world.
+1
Level 67
Dec 20, 2019
I need to clarify (based on some responses) that my comment did not intend to suggest that Japan had a low murder rate *because* it is homogeneous. I was saying that Japan's murder rate is low because its whole society is built around harmony and cooperation. I then mused, in a freewheeling way, that the fact that 98% of the country shares the same ethnicity is likely *one* of the factors that makes it easier for them to find common ground when setting those social norms and encouraging cooperation. Your comment has made me rephrase my original statement: when you have a largely homogeneous culture, it is more likely the citizenry as a whole will have a shared general view of what is acceptable and unacceptable behavior. There is no guarantee those views will be enlightened though.
+7
Level 62
Dec 11, 2021
I see a pattern here! It's the...
+1
Level 90
May 1, 2022
You'll probably get banned if you finish that thought just saying lol
+1
Level 59
Dec 11, 2021
Woah I had like 5/10 with 10 seconds remaining and then I got all the rest, interesting stuff. And yay Maryland gotta represent
+1
Level 38
Dec 11, 2021
Thanks to DeKalb county, where most of the murders in GA occur and where most of the murderers in GA are, GA has a 8.8 murder rate with an addition of 57% change of murder rate.

If you're on the news in GA, EVERY SINGLE DAY, you hear "There was a crash in Cobb county... and Somebody murdered somebody ~(No specific detail)~ in DeKalb county, blah blah, ~(something about)~ Buckhead has/is going to be broken away from Atlanta, blah, blah, traffic in Fulton county, Gwinnett county, Cobb county, and DeKalb county is slow as usual, ~(Random Weather stuff)~" No more detail on what else happens in DeKalb county and ESPECIALLY what age of the person who got murdered was.

+3
Level 62
Dec 11, 2021
If you know what correlated strongly with murder rate, it's a pretty easy quiz
+3
Level 46
Dec 12, 2021
So that's what they mean by southern hospitality.
+2
Level 58
Dec 12, 2021
Obviously watching good college football (or living in Maryland) makes you a murderer.
+1
Level 68
Dec 12, 2021
I have no idea why, but my first four guesses were Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana.
+1
Level 55
Dec 13, 2021
Interestingly only 1 of these 10 states war a free state at the start of the civil war, coincidence?
+1
Level 56
Feb 10, 2022
basically just think of the cities that contribute to these murder rates lol
+2
Level 84
Mar 28, 2022
All of these states at the forefront of the push to defund the police... obviously... which is the only reason crime or murders happen in the United States according to some news channels the past couple years. Louisiana, Mississippi, Arkansas, Alabama, South Carolina, Missouri... all known bastions of extreme leftism.
+1
Level 54
Jul 10, 2022
This is sarcasm, right?