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Pairs #25 (Legalese Edition)

Select the other half of each pair. Assume the word “and” (or an ampersand) between the hint and the answer.

Please read the sticky comment for information that may help you complete the quiz.

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Quiz by arjaygee
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Last updated: February 13, 2024
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First submittedFebruary 13, 2024
Times taken22
Average score56.0%
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Soc
Soc and sac (alternative forms socan and sacan, sac and soc, or sake and soke) (UK, law, historical) The right of a lord to hear and decide legal cases on his estate without recourse to other courts.
By
By and between. Synonyms or near-synonyms. (See sticky comment.)
Year
Year and a day. A rule associated with the former common law standard that death could not be legally attributed to acts or omissions that occurred more than a year and a day before the death.
Bind
Bind and obligate. Synonyms or near-synonyms. (See sticky comment.)
Abuttals
Abuttals and boundaries (or butts and bounds). Boundary lines between plots of land.
Order
Order and direct. Synonyms or near-synonyms. (See sticky comment.)
Taxes
Taxes and other costs. All costs associated with the matter at hand.
If
If and to the extent that. If something occurs that falls within defined boundaries.
Give
Give and grant. Synonyms or near-synonyms. (See sticky comment.)
Release
Release and discharge. A type of written document used to compromise a dispute.
Lands
Lands and tenements (or lands, tenements and hereditaments). Real property: land and building structures sitting on it.
Aid
Aid and abet. To assist someone in committing or to encourage someone to commit a crime.
Understood
Understood and agreed. Comprehended the clause in question and assented to its terms.
Execute
Execute and deliver. Synonyms or near-synonyms. (See sticky comment.)
Made
Made and entered into. Synonyms or near-synonyms. (See sticky comment.)
Depose
Depose and say. Synonyms or near-synonyms. (See sticky comment.)
Deem
Deem and consider. Synonyms or near-synonyms. (See sticky comment.)
Cease
Cease and desist. Synonyms or near-synonyms. (See sticky comment.)
Bargain
Bargain and sale. In US real property law, a type of deed by “which the grantor implies to have or have had an interest in the property but offers no warranties of title to the grantee.”
Facts
Facts and circumstances. Synonyms or near-synonyms. (See sticky comment.)
Cancelled
Cancelled and void. Synonyms or near-synonyms. (See sticky comment.)
Pain
Pain and suffering. Physical discomfort and emotional distress.
Keep
Keep and maintain. Synonyms or near-synonyms. (See sticky comment.)
Waif
Waif and stray. A legal privilege commonly granted by the Crown to landowners under Anglo-Norman law. A waif was an item of ownerless and unclaimed property found on a landowner's territory, while a stray referred to a domestic animal that had wandered onto the same land. A grant of waif and stray permitted the landowner to take ownership of such goods or animals if they remained unclaimed after a set period of time.
Have
Have and hold. Synonyms or near-synonyms. (See sticky comment.)
a day
Abet
Agreed
Between
Boundaries
Circumstances
Consider
Deliver
Desist
Direct
Discharge
Entered into
Grant
Hold
Maintain
Obligate
Other costs
Sac
Sale
Say
Stray
Suffering
Tenements
To the extent that
Void
1 Comments
+1
Level 66
Feb 13, 2024
Many of the pairs in this quiz are examples of what are known as “legal doublets.” Legal doublets are standardized phrases used in English legal language.

In many cases, the two elements of the pair are either synonyms or near-synonyms, e.g., “null and void.”

While at first blush this practice may seem odd, the use of doublets came about after the Norman conquest of England as the country transitioned from using Old English in legal documents to using Latin and Law French. To ensure all parties to an agreement understood their legal obligations, lawyers decided to duplicate some terms, using one English word and its linguistic counterpart in Law French or “Frenchified” Latin.

Over time, everyday English absorbed some 10,000 Norman French words as it evolved into Middle English, and both language and culture evolved past the point where most things could be specifically identified as having Anglo-Saxon or Norman French origins. Even so, the use of legal doublets continued.