AS Sociology Key Terms - Families and Households

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Last updated: May 5, 2017
First submittedMay 5, 2017
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Definition
Answer
A family with a long, thin structure. For example, there might be 4 generations alive, but each generation hasn’t had many children. This is a 21st century example of an extended family, but its members are more likely to live apart than in the past.
Bean Pole Family
The number of babies born per thousand per year.
Birth Rate
The legally or formally recognised union of a man and a woman (or in some countries two people of the same sex) in a committed relationship.
Civil Partnership
Two people living together in the same household in an emotionally intimate, committed relationship without being officially married.
Co-habitation
Where new technologies lead to new products which people can buy which reduces the amount of domestic labour people have to do at home – e.g. hoovers, washing machines, microwaves and microwave meals reduce the amount of time spend cleaning, washing and cooking.
Commercialisation of Housework
The number of deaths per thousand members of a population per year.
Death Rate
When someone does both paid work and a significant amount of the domestic labour, such as housework at home. According to radical feminists, it is mainly women who suffer this
Dual Burden
Refers to things to do with money – for example how wealth a society is and the amount of wealth and income an individual or family has.
Economic Factors
Definition
Answer
Thinking about the emotional well-being of other members of the family and acting in ways which will be of emotional benefit to others. For example, hugging and reassuring children when they have nightmares, organizing Christmas and birthday parties so that everyone feels included and has a good time.
Emotion Work
Family beyond the traditional nuclear family, incorporating aunts, uncles, and grandparents. In the traditional extended family, members live in the same household, in more modern extended families
Extended family
The ‘expected’ patterns of behaviour associated with masculinity and femininity – for example, femininity = caring, masculinity = competitive.
Gender Norms
The social positions and occupations we associate with men and women – for example we tend to associate the caring role with women, and the ‘provider role’ with men.
Gender Roles
The increasing interconnectedness of societies across the globe.
Globalisation
The process where individuals have more freedom to make life-choices and shape their identities because of a weakening of traditional social structures, norms and values. For example, secularization means people have more choice over whether they should get married or simply cohabit.
Individualisation
The provider or breadwinner role which involves going out to work and earning money for the family – the traditional male role within the family.
Instrumental Role
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