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Ultimate Music Terms Quiz

Given by the definition, name all the musical terms!
Some of these come from the "Musical Direction Words Quiz" by Quizmaster.
These are US terms rather than UK terms, but I still try to be lenient with type-ins.
Quiz by xXSeanCuber22Xx
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Last updated: January 4, 2019
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First submittedNovember 2, 2018
Times taken97
Average score54.5%
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Definition
Term
Very slow
Largo
Slow and stately
Adagio
At a walking pace
Andante
Moderately
Moderato
Fast, quick, and bright
Allegro
Very fast
Presto
Speeding up
Accelerando
Slowing down
Ritardando
Continuous slide upward or downward between two notes (especially harp)
Glissando
Play with the mute (string instruments)
Con Sord
A quavering or vibratory sound, especially a rapid alternation of sung or played notes
Trill
Play only on the G string
Sul G
Very soft
Pianissimo
Soft
Piano
Somewhat soft
Mezzo Piano
Somewhat loud
Mezzo Forte
Loud
Forte
Very loud
Fortissimo
Getting louder
Crescendo
Getting softer
Diminuendo
Sweetly
Dolce
Bowing term played louder or more forcefully than the surrounding music
Marcato
Dot that indicates notes should be detached
Staccato
Notes should be smooth and connected
Legato
For strings, plucked rather than bowed
Pizzicato
To be played with the bow, usually after plucking
Arco
Birdseye that means a note should be held
Fermata
Chord played in series like a harp
Arpeggio
Definition
Term
Played by just one person
Solo
Played by all together
Tutti
Played with the wood of the bow
Col Legno
Two players reading the same musical staff to divide into two or more voice parts
Divisi
Two notes played on two different strings at the same time
Double Stop
Words sang by a vocalist.
Lyrics
A beat in music held for four beats
Whole Note
A beat in music held for two beats
Half Note
A beat in music held for one beat
Quarter Note
A beat in music held for 1/8 beat
Eighth Note
A beat in music held for 1/16 beat
Sixteenth Note
A period of silence between notes
Rest
To perform two different notes in one bowing (legato)
Slur
Two notes of the same pitch connected by a curve indicating that they are to be played for the combined duration of their time values
Tie
A term marked by two lines and two dots implicating that you have to play the given measure again
Repeat
Any of the sections, typically of equal time value, into which a musical composition is divided, shown on a score by vertical lines across the staff; bar
Measure
A set of five parallel lines and the spaces between them, on which notes are written to indicate their pitch
Staff
Any of several symbols placed at the left-hand end of a staff, indicating the pitch of the notes written on it
Clef
The clef that violins play
Treble
The clef that violas play
Alto
The clef that cellos and basses play
Bass
A singing range between baritone and alto
Tenor
A singing range between tenor and bass
Baritone
A time signature indicating 2 or 4 half-note beats in a bar; alla breve
Cut Time
Two numbers divided by a bar after a clef noting what rhythm the piece is played in
Time Signature
Sharps or flats on a staff indicating what key the piece should be played in
Key Signature
An extra note added as an embellishment and not essential to the harmony or melody
Grace Note
3 Comments
+2
Level 95
Nov 2, 2018
Nice quiz! You might make it clear in the instructions that these are US rather than UK terms (we usually talk about semibreves, minims, crotchets etc. rather than whole, half, quarter notes). Also there's a typo: it is Col legno (col, rather than con - see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Col_legno)
+1
Level 61
Nov 3, 2018
Thank you! Will fix =)
+1
Level 66
Nov 25, 2021
I never do well with terms involving string instruments even though my son plays the cello! And I am a piano teacher.

A couple of corrections- 8th notes receive 1/2 beat, not 1/8th. 16th notes receive 1/4 beat (in common time). The reason they are called by those fractions is because it takes 8 8th notes to equal a whole note, and 16 16th notes to equal a whole note. All of the divisions (half, quarter, eighth, sixteenth) are named by their relation to a whole note.

Grateful to find your quizzes. Thanks.