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Proto-Indo-European doublets in Modern English adjectives

A doublet is a set of two words in the same language which are distinct but ultimately come from the same etymological root - for example, the words 'fear' (from Old English) and 'peril' (from Latin) which both ultimately derive from the same Proto-Indo-European root. In the below quiz, find the Germanic/Old English-derived doublet for each Latin-derived word given. The etymologically-related parts of the word have been put in bold.
Note: only the parts of the clue words in bold are etymologically related to the answer words
Quiz by xyz17
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Last updated: May 13, 2021
First submittedMay 13, 2021
Times taken20
Average score14.3%
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Latin-derived doublet
Linking clue
Germanic-derived word
adult
grown-up
old
durable
sticks around
true
paternal
like a dad
fatherly
lipid
dearly clings on
alive
gentle
in his own special way
kind
satiated
fed up
sad
advisable
the best thing to do
wise
municipal
common, vulgar, harsh
mean
robust
like mahogany
red
pedestrian
ankles and toes
footly
mordant
with a cutting wit
smart
brief
time flies when you're having fun
merry
juvenile
a child, for example
young
similar
they're almost alike
same
funereal
regards passing away
deadly
ulcerous
infected
ill
proper
not belonging to another
free
edible
can be consumed
eatable
acerbic
cutting
sharp
crude
unprocessed
raw
cordial
e.g. a helping
hearty
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