thumbnail

World's Most Ethical Companies

They've been judged the best (most ethical) companies across multiple vetted and trusted sources.
Not a complete list of course, just a sampling.
Quiz by kalbahamut
Rate:
Last updated: October 15, 2018
First submittedMarch 31, 2013
Times taken256
Average score44.4%
Rating2.33
Report this quizReport
5:00
Enter answer here
0
 / 9 guessed
The quiz is paused. You have remaining.
Scoring
You scored / = %
This beats or equals % of test takers also scored 100%
The average score is
Your high score is
Your fastest time is
Keep scrolling down for answers and more stats ...
Hint
Answer
Covalence ranked them the #1 most ethical company in the world in 2011. Ranked as #1 in service by Fortune and 12th most admired. The company pumps billions per year into R&D in efforts to improve information technology that has implications for healthcare and all aspects of human development, in addition to consistently delivering solid, quality products at reasonable cost to consumers unlike some of their fruity competitors. In the past, their technology was invaluable to the Allied war effort to defeat Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan.
IBM
Honored by Ethisphere as among the most ethical companies in the world three years running for promoting ethical business practices and exceeding legal standards. Covalene recognized them for their work in green biofuels. Took steps to save employee pensions while other companies in its sector were going under. The company's founder took revolutionary unilateral steps after the Great Depression by more than doubling wages while simultaneously slashing working hours, driving up manufacturing wages all over the world and effectively creating the middle class of the Western world. His philosophy that workers should be able to afford the products they make, and have the time to enjoy them, set an unprecedented global standard. Commitment to creating high-quality affordable products ushered in an era of both local and global prosperity. Also lent invaluable assistance to the Allied war effort to defeat Hitler in spite of the company founder's commitment to peace and activism against both WW1 and WW2.
Ford
Repeatedly near the top of Covalence's ethical company rankings, this company pioneered new chip processing technology to minimize water use and reduce toxic emissions. The company's executives work in regular cubicles and take public transportation forgoing lavish lifestyles, and the CEO demands regular updates on employee injuries.
Intel
The only food and beverage company to make EthiSphere's list of most ethical companies all seven years of the list's publication, even while weathering criticisms from nutter pro-lifers. Also ranked #3 most ethical by Covalence. Being a large company that does massive business all over the globe, including being the first American product sold in the former Soviet Union, consistency could be a problem. But in 2012 the company enstated a "Global Code of Conduct" to help ensure ethical conduct of all of it employees around the world.
PepsiCo
This company was first recognized as among the most ethical companies in the world by Ethisphere in a year when competitors in its sector Apple, Google, and Facebook did not make the list at all. The company's founder leads a notoroiously frugal lifestyle in spite of being among the wealthiest people on Earth, and is also among the world's most generous and active philanthropists. Even after parting ways, his company continues to practice internal transparency and also donates millions to non-profits while investing more into programs for economic development around the world, and Covalence recognized them for helping advance equal human rights even in a hostile political climate.
Microsoft
Recognized by Ethisphere, this company has taken a strong stance on not only its own ethics but those of its suppliers, insisting on buying "fair trade" and responsibly grown coffee beans, earning the company a reputation for corporate and environmental responsibility. They've also tried to save the rainforest. Often maligned for being a big chain competing against many smaller competitors, the company continues to thrive by offering a quality, responsibly produced product in high demand with its customers as it has since its inception.
Starbucks
This company pays its mostly unskilled employees an average of $17 an hour, 42% more than it's closest competitor (a WalMart subsidiary). Employees pay only 8% of their own health costs on average, compared to 25% for others in similar industries. In spite of rapid growth and large revenues, the CEO has a base salary of $350,000, less than 10% of many other US CEOs. The company also welcome unionization amongst its employees, and was recognized by EthiSphere on its list of most ethical companies.
CostCo
One of the few companies to make EthiSphere's list seven years consecutively, in spite of being one of the largest companies in the world. This company caught considerable flak for not paying corporate income taxes in the United States, though it's usually overlooked that the reason for this was the substantial investments that the company had made into sustainable energy. The company was a founder of Transparency International, an organization that fights corruption worldwide and the impact it has on people's lives.
General Electric Co. (GE)
This company was named by EthiSphere as among the world's most ethical in part for its commitment to animal welfare even while being among the world's leading sellers of food products. In EthiSphere's own words, the food industry is the largest industry in the world, and (this company) has clearly stood apart in introducing healthier food fare, sustainable packaging, food safety, and ethical purchasing practices. They were also recognized by Covalence for raising wages of overseas workers, including paying Chinese employees 56% above government guidelines.
McDonald's
+4
Level 84
May 27, 2021
This quiz was originally made just to piss off previous JetPunk user and well-documented passionate anti-American bigot OzChris.... who had made a quiz called "World's Worst Companies," featuring many of the same companies on this quiz, and from what I could tell based entirely off of racist and Amerophobic conspiracy theories, coupled with some cherry picked data and out-of-context anecdotal information.

It served its original purpose very well. Oz was ranting for days. It remains to entertain and maybe enlighten... but don't take the title too seriously. I'm sure there are better companies out there.

+1
Level 79
Mar 31, 2013
Got 'em all except for McDonalds. I was thinking food processing as opposed to restaurants. Funny how both Ford & IBM make the "World's Best" & the "World's Worst" business lists...
+1
Level 84
Mar 31, 2013
well.. their inclusion on the worst list was questionable at best and based on very distant very loosely established guilt-by-association, and a bit of conspiracy theory silliness published in a couple of controversial books. The most damning thing in Ford's past I would say is their once pitiable environmental record, not the anti-Semitic newspaper that Henry published for a while (and discontinued as soon as he was told it was being used as Nazi propaganda). But they're making efforts to make amends for the environmental mistakes, which may be why they recently made the most ethical list. IBM, on the other hand, has never actually done anything especially wrong that I'm aware of. I didn't make the other quiz. Thanks for taking both!! :) and good job on getting 8/9.
+2
Level 40
Mar 31, 2013
Kal trashing me and my quiz is unacceptable. It'd be quiet easy to deconstruct your quiz... but, as I've continually pointed out to you, quiz comments aren't an appropriate forum for endless discussions. I won't be harassing you or graffitting your quiz just because I find it questionable. :)
+1
Level 84
Jan 13, 2019
Oz, if you have something interesting to say about one of my quizzes, by all means say it. I welcome all legitimate feedback, good and bad, and if I respond to that feedback I won't be surprised or offended if that leads to debate or conversation, nor would I interpret such conversation as harrassment. I would say thanks for taking the quiz, but from the stats at the time you left this comment I could see that you hadn't actually even taken it.

Showing up on a quiz you haven't even taken to leave these sorts of comments seems kind of like what you were (unfairly) accusing me of...

+1
Level 84
Apr 6, 2013
I would welcome anyone interested in the subject to do their own research, as you can find more complete information online. But since there is some interest I thought I'd just delve briefly into the history of Ford. I could do the same for all the companies listed here as I researched it pretty thoroughly.....

In Ford's case, concerning their historical treatment of employees: Henry Ford almost singlehandedly created the middle class of the Western world by unilaterally more than doubling his employee's wages and simultaneously reducing working hours. His employees were among the first in the nation and the world to work an 8 hour day and 40 hour work week- something that is standard today but at the time was practically unheard of. They also were likely the highest paid workers in manufacturing jobs in the world at that time. Turnover rates at Ford plummeted, and qualified mechanics and engineers from other companies flocked to the company. This resulted in wages rising everywhere.

+1
Level 84
Apr 6, 2013
Ford believed that his workers should be able to afford the products that they were making- a revolutionary idea at the time, and one that could still afford to be learned by many modern companies. I'm not sure where Oz got the thing about timed bathroom breaks, but even though certainly, if true, such a thing would put Ford in the same league as Genghis Khan, for whatever reason his company was still considered the best place to work in its time....

Concerning labor unions, it's true Ford was notoriously anti-union. This was because he felt (correctly) that corrupt union bosses sometimes did more harm than good when it came to the workers they were supposed to represent. It's true that Ford went too far to try and protect his plants from union influence. Though he never had employees beaten, that's a lie, security personnel under his employ did assault several men (union organizers, not Ford employees) who were organizing in front of the Ford plant in Dearborn.

+1
Level 84
Apr 6, 2013
After the incident in Dearborn, Ford finally caved to union pressure and signed one of the most generous deals with the United Auto Workers that they had yet procured. Since that time (1937, ancient history) Ford has remained among the best places in the world to work for manufacturing sector employees, though the company has gone through ups and downs similar to the rest of the industry. In the 1940s-1970s the American auto industry had very little competition. Starting in the 1980s, to remain competitive, the big ones had to layoff many employees, Ford included. However, as mentioned in the quiz, Ford took steps to avoid having to accept government bailout money like GM and Chrysler did, and also tried to remain solvent and secure employee pensions in the process....

Concerning Ford's safety record: they were among the first automotive companies to even look into passenger safety. Robert McNamara pioneered studies on making cars safer at Ford.

+1
Level 84
Apr 6, 2013
and in 1955, even though market research showed that nobody wanted them, Ford became the first big auto manufacturer to offer cars with seat belts and padded dashboards. This was 3 years before the first European manufacturer did the same (Saab), and 4 years before Congress passed any law concerning automobile safety standards. Through the present, Ford has continued to make safe and high-quality vehicles. In fact the Ford Fusion was named among the 13 safest cars for 2013 by Forbes.... Concerning Ford's environmental record: this is a bit more problematic for the company. They have a history of dumping toxic paint sludge where it shouldn't go, and then trying to avoid taking responsibility for it. But recently they've been trying to make amends for the past by cleaning up ecological damage caused by the company in the past, and as mentioned they've received recognition for research into green biofuels. The concept of the American gas guzzler is about 30-40 years out of date.
+1
Level 84
Apr 6, 2013
Concerning the Nazi connection: mostly bollocks, at least insofar as certain people would like to stretch the truth to make it seem like Ford was on board with the Holocaust. Yes, Ford was heavily invested in Germany prior to WW2. Ford and GM controlled 70% of the German auto market. The US continued doing business with Germany up until Pearl Harbor officially. Companies and governments all over the world at the time were sympathetic toward Germany as many thought the Treaty of Versailles was unfair. Doing business with Germany up through the 1930s is hardly damning. Most international companies at the time did. The concentration camps didn't start opening until the late 30s, and the outside world didn't become aware of the Holocaust until the 1940s. By 1939 Ford's German subsidiaries had basically been absorbed into the German government, as ALL industry in the country had been. And by 1942 Ford was churning out B52s to help in the Allied war effort.
+1
Level 84
Apr 6, 2013
It's true that Hitler admired Ford. This was in part because Ford was a great industrialist who wanted to improve the lives of his workers and the common man. Hitler thought of himself in the same way. It was also in large part due to Ford's antisemitic newspaper. The Dearborn Independent was published by Henry Ford (independent of the Ford Motor Company) from 1919 to 1927. In its pages were often published antisemitic conspiracy theories, extremely popular at the time in Europe, concerning Elders of Zion and international banking conspiracies etc. Henry Ford was a pacifist that resisted US involvement in both WW1 and WW2. He regarded war as an "utter waste." Regrettably, his newspaper bought in to the popular lie that Jewish bankers were conspiring together to start all wars in order to profit from them. Hitler of course responded very positively to the newspaper. This doesn't make them co-conspirators. The paper was shut down in 1927 after being denounced by the Anti-Defamation League
+1
Level 84
Apr 6, 2013
Re: both EthiSphere and Covalence listing Ford as among the most ethical companies in the world, thus earning a spot on this list: you'd have to take it up with them. Anyone interested can look up their methodology. As mentioned, how companies have been behaving in the past year is more important than 80 years ago. Today, Ford exceeds legal standards and promotes ethical and responsible business practices. In the past, the company created the middle class, made automobiles affordable to the common man, and helped defeat Hitler and Hirohito. Henry Ford may have been a flawed man, but he also believed: "There is one rule for the industrialist and that is: Make the best quality of goods possible, at the lowest cost possible, paying the highest wage possible." He was harshly critical of those that would sacrifice the quality of products or employee well-being for profit. He demonstrated over and over that this was not just rhetoric, but a deeply held belief.
+1
Level 40
Apr 14, 2013
If you don't believe that Nazi-supporting, anti-semetic, union-busting, government subsidy grabbing and exploitative companies should be described as "Ethical" try "World's Worst Companies". :)
+1
Level 84
Apr 15, 2013
And if you believe everything you read without giving it any critical thought or consideration so long as it confirms your own prejudices, and are afraid to have those prejudices questioned in any way, even better. Oz was recommending one of his quizzes (not changing the title of this quiz) if that wasn't clear from the comment he left. You can find his quizzes by clicking on his name.
+1
Level 84
Apr 15, 2013
you can also find some hilariously non-self-aware comments on the same quiz.
+1
Level 39
Jun 1, 2015
SemItic.
+1
Level 84
Jan 13, 2019
Interestingly, this ridiculous quiz that Oz made seems to have disappeared from the site years after Oz himself stopped making appearances here. Odd. In it, Oz props up many absurd conspiracy theories (because they helped prop up his own prejudices against the USA) including some that Henry Ford and IBM were supporting the Nazis. The quiz and the histrionics he got in to in the comments section were epic and hilarious, I'm kind of sad and kind of happy at the same time to see them go. The other quiz's existence is the whole reason I authored this quiz in the first place. (to piss off Oz)
+1
Level 77
Aug 3, 2014
A very interesting and informative quiz. Thanks. (Can't believe I didn't get Starbucks, or that I sat there thinking, "What is the name of that company that makes the Intel Pentium chip???")
+1
Level 73
Dec 16, 2020
This was actually easier than I thought it would be. Interesting.
+1
Level 65
Feb 18, 2022
Wasn't Henry Ford basically a Nazi?
+1
Level 84
Feb 18, 2022
not even close. Is that you, OzChris?
+1
Level 65
Feb 21, 2022
Hmm... I thought I saw that in a book somewhere, of course, it could have been wrong. Anyways, I have no idea who 'OzChris' is and I have nothing against America because it's my home country :D
+1
Level 84
Feb 21, 2022
He's an American-hating Australian guy who, almost ten years ago, published a quiz on this site called "World's Worst Companies" full of a lot of misleading libel and conspiracy theories - mostly aimed at American companies - many of which feature on this version of the quiz which I made in response to Oz's quiz, both to correct the record and annoy Oz, which I'd say I succeeded at especially the 2nd thing.

Anyway, among the bogus lies that Oz put on his own quiz were that Henry Ford was a Nazi sympathizer or inspired the Holocaust. This isn't true. What is true is that Ford, like a lot of people at the time, had some anti-Semitic views. He was also a bit of a conspiracy theorist who subscribed to various international banking conspiracies etc. And, back in the 40s, as remains true today, a lot of conspiracy theories like this have heavy anti-Semitic themes dating back to the Middle Ages.

+1
Level 84
Feb 21, 2022
Regrettably, from 1920-1927 Henry produced a very low-circulation newspaper in Dearborn where he reprinted a lot of these conspiracy theories, including blaming Jews for WW1. These ideas were of course well received in Nazi Germany where the paper was reprinted in four volumes. But the newspaper was a small passion project for Ford and had nothing at all to do with the Ford Motor Company

It's also true that Hitler called Ford an inspiration. And in 1938 German officials awarded Ford their highest medal for foreigners - for his "humanitarian ideals" and commitment to the "cause of peace." Ford accepted the medal at a small ceremony in Michigan. It's possible, perhaps even likely, that Ford's anti-Semitic ideas contributed to his being given this award. But it's at least equally as probable that Hitler admired him simply for being the quintessential industrialist and populist that he was. His racist newspaper being a tiny side project.

+1
Level 84
Feb 21, 2022
It's true that Ford's ideas and methods contributed greatly toward the creation of Volkswagen in Germany (the "people's" car) - and that there were even Ford engineers working for the company that was modeled on the unparalleled success of Ford. But... this all happened in peacetime when Germany was still considered a US ally. Further muckraking about Ford being deep in cahoots with Hitler and pro-Nazi are conspiratorial nonsense.

Ford was a devout anti-war pacifist. He was strongly against Nazi militarism. When he learned that his old small newspaper was being used in Nazi propaganda to promote hate crimes and racist anti-Jewish legislation, he denounced it. And by the time war began, industry in Germany had been nationalized and none was under the control of Ford. (Oz spread the lie that Ford had factories in Germany producing material for the Nazi war effort) In fact, Ford produced more war material for the Allies than any other company. So this allegation is very silly.

+1
Level 84
Feb 21, 2022
Anyway, I'd link to Oz's original quiz here, but it seems to have been removed from the site which is probably for the best.
+1
Level 65
Feb 21, 2022
Ahhh that makes more sense, thank you for explaining in detail.
+1
Level 84
Feb 21, 2022
You're welcome. Though... I only just now glanced up at previous comments on this quiz and see I'd said a lot of the same stuff already. Years ago.
+1
Level 70
Aug 11, 2022
I’d really love to know why you so casually dismiss Fords ‘little side-project?’ Since the articles published in the Dearborn Independent, collectively titled upon release in pamphlet form: ‘The International Jew: The World’s Foremost Problem, were, at one point foisted on the buyers of Ford cars (by Ford’s own instructions to dealers), I would suggest that the true circulation is not clear, and certainly underestimated here. However, this is perhaps beside the point, the fact remains that Ford held these views, and ultimately retained them, despite an earlier, unsigned retraction. He is on record, in 1940, as stating that he was interested in republishing them (the series of articles was accompanied by a reprinting of the Protocols of the Elders of Zion because, of course it was). Claims that the articles were written and published by an underling without his knowledge have been thoroughly debunked.The articles are a vicious screed, not excused by any of his other achievements.
+1
Level 70
Aug 11, 2022
The size of the circulation is unimportant in any case, antisemitism is antisemitism, no matter how loudly or otherwise, it is shouted or whispered, or indeed, if it is kept to oneself.

Strictly speaking, the views held by Henry Ford have no bearing on the ethics of the present day company and therefore, it’s inclusion here is not necessarily an issue (although I’d be interested to read more about the methodology used to decide upon these 9 saintly institutions). Therefore, the great defence of the man himself is already unnecessary. Minimising the importance of his anti-Semitic views and publications, however, is egregious, especially if the impulse to do so is to gain the upper hand in the most peculiar of internet feuds with someone who appears to have disengaged from said feud long ago. You know you’re not arguing against Oz anymore by posting this apologia for a racist, he isn’t here. So who’s benefit is this for?

+1
Level 84
Aug 11, 2022
I feel like the points I was making were already clear. I'm not excusing racism, but the smears that Oz was posting against Ford, who was indeed a great man, were ridiculous conspiracy-theory nonsense. Yeah, Ford held some anti-Semitic views. Most Americans and Europeans alive at the time did. Many still do. Nobody's perfect. But most of those people alive then or now did not also defeat the Nazis or create the middle class of Western civilization. Minimizing these things, just because the man was American (which is the reason Oz was doing so), or because of his "little side project," would be more egregious than the thing you imply I'm doing but am not doing. Pointing out that Ford held anti-semitic views and published a low circulation newspaper that forward racist conspiracy theories is fine. And I do that myself. Saying he was "basically a Nazi" is also just flat-out wrong and needs to be corrected.
+1
Level 84
Aug 11, 2022
and re: disengaging from the feud.... you're bringing up the subject now, so I'm engaging with you, not Oz. This quiz was originally published in 2013. That's when I was engaging with Oz. and then Goat posted his comment this year, so I was engaging with him, and explaining where the quiz originally came from. You would probably have had to seen Oz's absurd original to really get it.

Anyway... pretty silly to dredge up an old thread and then point fingers at others for replying to the one who dredged it up.

+1
Level 84
Feb 21, 2022
In the 1930s, before Germany declared war on the US, before their ally Japan attacked Pearl Harbor, and before the abhorrent atrocities of the Holocaust came to light, there were many in the US who were Nazi sympathizers. And this wasn't really that unusual. Many Americans had German ancestry. It was also a very popular opinion worldwide that Germany had been unfairly punished by the Treaty of Versailles and that they were owed some sort of recompense. But Henry Ford wasn't really a strong example of one of these people. He was always anti-war and from the beginning one of the Nazis biggest goals was re-building German military strength. A better example would be Charles Lindbergh.