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US States Gaining/Losing Congressional Districts 2020

After the 2020 US Census, which states will gain or lose congressional districts?
Quiz by Jerry928
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Last updated: April 26, 2021
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First submittedApril 26, 2021
Times taken49
Average score84.6%
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states gaining
+2
Texas
+1
Colorado
+1
Florida
+1
Oregon
+1
Montana
+1
North Carolina
states losing
-1
California
-1
Illinois
-1
Michigan
-1
New York
-1
Ohio
-1
Pennsylvania
-1
West Virginia
9 Comments
+1
Level 60
Apr 26, 2021
Looks like I might need to update my 'US Congressional Districts' quiz! Lol
+1
Level 55
Apr 27, 2021
Instead of redrawing the borders and leaving way for Gerrymandering, I think it should be when a state loses a seat, the least populous seat get's merged with a neighboring seat, and when a state gains one, the most populated seat should be divided into two equal republican and democrat parts. In 2000, the republicans Gerrymandered so hard, that they divided the very liberal city of Austin so it encompasses 5 districts where only one is democrat. And it's not like the Dems haven't either.

Edit: I also found an example where the Democrats drew a tiny sliver through many counties on Lake erie to create another Democrat district

https://thefulcrum.us/worst-gerrymandering-districts-example/1-beside-lake-erie

+3
Level 55
Apr 27, 2021
This is a bad idea, all congressional districts in a state are 1% of each other by population, merging the least populous district to a neighboring one would make that district twice as populous as the next biggest one, which isn't exactly representative if you ask me.

Also states that don't change the number of districts also have to redistrict, because they need to be in that 1% rule.

+1
Level 55
Apr 27, 2021
Good point @IAB. I didn't realize that the districts were so close to each other in population. Maybe then the solution is to not take slivers of counties, but whole counties only, and when necessary, combined counties. Yes there may be exclaves here and there, but These are districts not counties, and won't affect the way cities run. But then what's really the point of an election if all the districts are solid? While most people paint Gerrymandering as bad, what I have discovered today is that there really is no alternate solution.
+1
Level 55
Apr 27, 2021
@1ProximaCentauri in places like California that's even worse than the other option, Los Angeles County would just be a huge congressional district and it would be 3x larger than the next biggest one in California (San Diego County).

I agree with @NeilVedwan that every state should have independent committees drawing the congressional districts to stop gerrymandering.

+1
Level 76
Apr 27, 2021
In New Zealand, the districts of parliament are drawn by an independent commission. I am just amazed that gerrymandering (and drawing of a state's boundaries by the ruling party of that state) is allowed in the United States.
+1
Level 51
Apr 27, 2021
@IAB The states of Arizona, Colorado, California, and Michigan already have this plan implemented

@Jerry928 I can safely say I know nothing about NZ politics, but it seems like one of my favorites or single favorite is slightly better than I thought

Everyone: Check this out, it's very interesting!

+2
Level 51
Apr 27, 2021
Congrats MT!
+1
Level 93
Jun 30, 2021
Rhode Island *barely* hung onto their second seat, which, had they lost it, likely would have gone to Arizona.